Tag Archives: curt schilling

Did You Know…

The Arizona Diamondbacks were the fastest expansion team to reach the World Series, making it to the Fall Classic in their fourth year of existence, 2001.

2001World Series diamondbacks

Happy Birthday Curt Schilling!!!

Happy Birthday Curt Schilling!!!

Curt Schilling turns 47 years old today.

When you look at Schilling’s career numbers that span over 20 years, they are pretty impressive.  Don’t forget that for the first 12 years of his career he played with the Baltimore Orioles, Houston Astros, and Philadelphia Phillies.  None of these teams were doing much to support their pitchers while Curt was there.

With 216 career wins, 83 complete games, 3116 strikeouts and 3 20-win seasons under his belt, I wonder where he ranks against some of the other pitchers of his era.  A 3-time runner up for the Cy Young award and a 6-time All-Star, Curt Schilling has accomplished what few pitchers have been able to do.  Curt got better after his 30th birthday; much better!  I know that a lot of this has to do with the fact that he pitched for Arizona and Boston, both of whom he won a World Series with, but his ERA and strikeouts improved as well and those are individual stats.

I am not certain if Schilling is a Hall of Fame worthy player or not, but having 2 World Series rings does not hurt his resume.  Think of all of the 200+ winning pitchers with no championships and all of a sudden Schilling rises to the top.

Happy Birthday Mr. Schilling!!!

Curt Schilling’s Bloody Sock From 2004 World Series Sells For $92,613

Curt Schilling’s Bloody Sock From 2004 World Series Sells For $92,613

The Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — A bloody sock worn by Curt Schilling while pitching for the Boston Red Sox in Game 2 of the 2004 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals was sold for $92,613 at a live auction on Saturday night at the Fletcher-Sinclair Mansion.

Schilling had loaned his sock to the National Baseball Hall of Fame Museum but when his Rhode Island-based video game company ”38 Studios” went bankrupt, he decided to sell the sock that was bloodied as he pitched on an injured ankle.

Bidding began at $25,000 several weeks ago. Texas-based Heritage Auctions anticipated it would get more than $100,000.

An anonymous bidder submitted the winning bid.

”It’s a one of a kind item, so it’s really tough to gauge what kind of interest you’re going to get,” Chris Ivy, director of Sports Auctions for Heritage Auctions said. ”Sometimes you catch lightning in a bottle where a piece will take off like the Buckner ball. This particular time, it’s the first time we sold a sock with blood on it so it’s very hard to gauge what kind of final number it’s going to end up.”

Schilling helped end Boston’s 86-year championship drought – the ”Curse of the Bambino” – by pitching on an ankle that had been sutured more than once through the postseason. Pitching with a damaged tendon resulted in bleeding through the sock. Still, Schilling allowed only a run in six innings.

Curt Schilling To Sell ‘Bloody Sock’ Made Famous During 2004 World Series

Curt Schilling To Sell ‘Bloody Sock’ Made Famous During 2004 World Series

By David Brown, Big League Stew, Yahoo Sports

 

Famous people’s unwashed underwear. That’s where the money’s at.

Sensing an opportunity to make some cash, former major leaguer Curt Schilling is auctioning the second-most famous sock of his career, a bloody one worn on his right foot when he pitched Game 2 of the 2004 World Series for the Boston Red Sox. The Stew reported this possibility in October.

As Deadspin nobly points out, it’s not THE SOCK ™, the one Schilling wore when he pitched against the New York Yankees in the ALCS during Boston’s historic comeback, when the sutures in his surgically repaired ankle ruptured , he bled through and became something of a supernatural figure in Red Sox lore.

Where’s that sock? Probably in a landfill in New York somewhere. Schilling and the Red Sox weren’t savvy enough to save it before it was discarded in a Yankee Stadium dumpster and taken out with the rest of the icky trash. Who knows what that sock might go for on the open market? All we have is Schilling’s second bloody sock. ESPN’s Darren Rovell, who has made a cottage industry of tracking the value of everything in the known universe, made a guess as to what it’s worth:

 

It’s a tremendous piece of memorabilia that has been in the Baseball Hall of Fame for years. The blood, produced from a sutured tendon in his foot, symbolized the fight for the Boston Red Sox to finally win a title for the first time in 86 years.

Schilling has considered selling the item in the past, first in February 2005. At the time, a Red Sox collector I interviewed said he would bid on it and that he expected the price to soar north of $600,000. Others told me that number was light and that the sock could draw bids above $1 million.

(AP, Heritage Auctions)

Oh, sure. Schilling’s blood-encrusted sock gets into the Hall of Fame but Jeff Bagwell can’t. Can Rovell’s sources be right? A million bucks for a dirty sock? OK, a famous dirty sock? Schilling obviously hopes so. His other recent big business venture, a video game studio, collapsed due to mismanagement after reportedly producing one title. Will selling a million-dollar sock make up for the losses? It won’t begin to cover it, but selling the sock is part of a deal Schilling made to cover his debts.

Side question: In 100 years when cloning is common, will the owner of the bloody sock be able to make Li’l Curt Schillings from the dried DNA in the sock? What an epidemic it would be.

Heritage Auctions reports that the bidding starts in early February, with the hot and heavy auctioning set to wrap up Feb. 23-24.

Hall Of Fame Debate: PICK ONE: Mike Mussina OR Curt Schilling

Hall Of Fame Debate: PICK ONE: Mike Mussina OR Curt Schilling

Last week’s discussion about the worthiness of Jack Morris and his potential Hall of Fame election was a lot of fun.  And while we did not walk away with a resounding opinion of ‘Yes’ or ‘No’, we did have a lot of spirited opinions.

That got me to thinking about other pitchers that fall into the same category of star pitcher, ‘ace’ of the staff, perennial all-star, but maybe just a step behind the elite of the sport.

Ultimately, I landed on Mike Mussina and Curt Schilling, two highly decorated pitchers from the era after Morris that put up similar numbers and were always considered as dangerous threats to their opposition.

I’d like to take this week’s conversation to a different level.  YOU HAVE TO VOTE FOR ONE OF THESE GUYS!!!

Sure, if you had a BWAA vote, you may bypass both of them.  But, in the world of ’30-YOC’, I make the rules and I am saying that this is a true head-to-head match-up.

If you had to pick one player for Hall of Fame induction and your choices were Mike Mussina OR Curt Schilling, tell me who you’ve got.

I thought that I would summarize some of their pitching feats for you here:

  Mussina Schilling
Seasons 18 20
Wins 270 216
Losses 153 146
Win % 63.80% 59.70%
20-Win Seasons 1 2
Complete Games 57 83
Shutouts 23 20
ERA 3.68 3.46
Strikeouts 2813 3116
Walks 785 711
K:Walk 3.58 4.38
WHIP 1.192 1.137
All-Star 5 6
Gold Glove 7 -
Cy Young Finishes 2nd Place (1x) 2nd Place (3x)
Postseasons 9 12
World Series titles - 3

I told you that these guys have very comparable careers.

So, now the question is – Who would you vote for if you HAD TO CHOOSE ONE???

My pick has gone back and forth for the last few days since I started thinking about this match-up of very talented and durable pitchers.

Ultimately, I went with the guy that I would prefer to have on my pitching mound in Game 7 of a playoff.  I went with the guy that I felt had ‘better stuff’.  I went with the guy that I thought was the more accomplished and proven ‘big game’ performer.

By a very, very slim margin, my vote goes to Mr. Curt Schilling.

And that is my final answer!!!

Gavel

How about you?  Where would your vote lie?  Make your pick now – Mike Mussina OR Curt Schilling.

Thanks for reading.  Have a great night!!!

Bonds, Clemens, Biggio, Schilling, Sosa, Piazza Headline Hall Of Fame Ballot For Class Of 2013

Bonds, Clemens, Biggio, Schilling, Sosa, Piazza Headline Hall Of Fame Ballot For Class Of 2013

From Yahoo Sports:

NEW YORK (AP) — The most polarizing Hall of Fame debate since Pete Rose will now be decided by the baseball shrine’s voters: Do Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy Sosa belong in Cooperstown despite drug allegations that tainted their huge numbers?

In a monthlong election sure to become a referendum on the Steroids Era, the Hall ballot was released Wednesday, and Bonds, Clemens and Sosa are on it for the first time.

Bonds is the all-time home run champion with 762 and won a record seven MVP awards. Clemens took home a record seven Cy Young trophies and is ninth with 354 victories. Sosa ranks eighth on the homer chart with 609.

Yet for all their HRs, RBIs and Ws, the shadow of PEDs looms large.

”You could see for years that this particular ballot was going to be controversial and divisive to an unprecedented extent,” Larry Stone of The Seattle Times wrote in an email. ”My hope is that some clarity begins to emerge over the Hall of Fame status of those linked to performance-enhancing drugs. But I doubt it.”

More than 600 longtime members of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America will vote on the 37-player ballot. Candidates require 75 percent for induction, and the results will be announced Jan. 9.

Craig Biggio, Mike Piazza and Curt Schilling also are among the 24 first-time eligibles. Jack Morris, Jeff Bagwell and Tim Raines are the top holdover candidates.

If recent history is any indication, the odds are solidly stacked against Bonds, Clemens and Sosa. Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro both posted Cooperstown-caliber stats, too, but drug clouds doomed them in Hall voting.

Some who favor Bonds and Clemens claim the bulk of their accomplishments came before baseball got wrapped up in drug scandals. They add that PED use was so prevalent in the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s that it’s unfair to exclude anyone because so many who-did-and-who-didn’t questions remain.

Many fans on the other side say drug cheats – suspected or otherwise – should never be afforded the game’s highest individual honor.

Either way, this election is baseball’s newest hot button, generating the most fervent Hall arguments since Rose. The discussion about Rose was moot, however – the game’s career hits leader agreed to a lifetime ban in 1989 after an investigation concluded he bet on games while managing the Cincinnati Reds, and that barred him from the BBWAA ballot.

The BBWAA election rules allow voters to pick up to 10 candidates. As for criteria, this is the only instruction: ”Voting shall be based upon the player’s record, playing ability, integrity, sportsmanship, character, and contributions to the team(s) on which the player played.”

That leaves a lot of room for interpretation.

Bonds, Clemens and Sosa won’t get a vote from Mike Klis of The Denver Post.

”Nay on all three. I think in all three cases, their performances were artificially enhanced. Especially in the cases of Bonds and Clemens, their production went up abnormally late in their careers,” he wrote in an email.

They’ll do better with Bob Dutton of The Kansas City Star.

”I plan to vote for all three. I understand the steroid/PED questions surrounding each one, and I’ve wrestled with the implications,” he wrote in an email.

”My view is these guys played and posted Hall of Fame-type numbers against the competition of their time. That will be my sole yardstick. If Major League Baseball took no action against a player during his career for alleged or suspected steroid/PED use, I’m not going to do so in assessing their career for the Hall of Fame,” he said.

San Jose Mercury News columnist Mark Purdy will reserve judgment.

”At the beginning of all this, I made up my mind I had to adopt a consistent policy on the steroid social club. So, my policy has been, with the brilliance in the way they set up the Hall of Fame vote where these guys have a 15-year window, I’m not going to vote for any of those guys until I get the best picture possible of what was happening then,” he wrote in an email.

”We learn a little bit more each year. We learned a lot during the Bonds trial. We learned a lot during the Clemens trial. I don’t want to say I’m never going to vote for any of them. I want to wait until the end of their eligibility window and have my best idea of what was really going on,” he said.

Clemens was acquitted this summer in federal court on six counts that he lied and obstructed Congress when he denied using performance-enhancing drugs.

Bonds was found guilty in 2011 by a federal court jury on one count of obstruction of justice, ruling he gave an evasive answer in 2003 to a grand jury looking into the distribution of illegal steroids. Bonds is appealing the verdict.

McGwire is 10th on the career home run list with 583, but has never received even 24 percent in his six Hall tries. Big Mac has admitted to using steroids and human growth hormone.

Palmeiro is among only four players with 500 homers and 3,000 hits, yet has gotten a high of just 12.6 percent in his two years on the ballot. He drew a 10-day suspension in 2005 after a positive test for PEDs, and said the result was due to a vitamin vial given to him by teammate Miguel Tejada.

Biggio topped the 3,000-hit mark – which always has been considered an automatic credential for Cooperstown – and spent his entire career with the Houston Astros.

”Hopefully, the writers feel strongly that they liked what they saw, and we’ll see what happens,” Biggio said last week.

Schilling was 216-146 and won three World Series championships, including his ”bloody sock” performance for the Boston Red Sox in 2004.

Happy Birthday Curt Schilling!!!

Happy Birthday Curt Schilling!!!

Curt Schilling turns 46 years old today.

When you look at Schilling’s career numbers that span over 20 years, they are pretty impressive.  Don’t forget that for the first 12 years of his career he played with the Baltimore Orioles, Houston Astros, and Philadelphia Phillies.  None of these teams were doing much to support their pitchers while Curt was there. 

With 216 career wins, 83 complete games, 3116 strikeouts and 3 20-win seasons under his belt, I wonder where he ranks against some of the other pitchers of his era.  A 3-time runner up for the Cy Young award and a 6-time All-Star, Curt Schilling has accomplished what few pitchers have been able to do.  Curt got better after his 30th birthday; much better!  I know that a lot of this has to do with the fact that he pitched for Arizona and Boston, both of whom he won a World Series with, but his ERA and strikeouts improved as well and those are individual stats.

I am not certain if Schilling is a Hall of Fame worthy player or not, but having 2 World Series rings does not hurt his resume.  Think of all of the 200+ winning pitchers with no championships and all of a sudden Schilling rises to the top.

Happy Birthday Mr. Schilling!!!