Daily Archives: October 11, 2009

I Told You That I Was Going To Treat Myself – Part #4

Most collectors will look for any to find an excuse for buying more cards.  I am no different so when ’30-Year Old Cardboard’ reached the 100,000 hits milestone last week I decided to pick up a few of the cards that I had been watching.

Here is card #4

Murray 78T

Elected to the Hall of Fame in 2003, Murray is one of the most deadly hitters the game of baseball has ever seen.   As a switch-hitter, Murray was indefensible.  He can be described as the perfect combination of power and control at the plate.  Murray is a member of the very small 3,000 hit & 500 home run club.  In the history of baseball, only 4 players have ever accomplished this spectacular feat and Murray is one of them(the others being Aaron, Mays, and Palmeiro).  With 3,255 hits and 504 homers Murray has distinguished himself as the best all-around hitter to debut during the 1970’s.  In addition to his incredible hits and home run numbers, Murray was also a key source of run production.  With 1,917 RBI and 1,627 runs scored over the course of his career, Murray was a constant force at the plate.

The awards and accolades on Murray’s resume are impressive – Rookie of the Year, 3-time Gold Glove winner, 3-time Silver Slugger winner, and an 8-time All-star.  And while Murray was never able to capture the MVP award, he did finish in the Top 10 in 8 times.

Eddie Murray played in 3 World Series contests and won 1 championship title with the 1983 Baltimore Orioles.

I Told You That I Was Going To Treat Myself – Part #3

Most collectors will look for any to find an excuse for buying more cards.  I am no different so when ’30-Year Old Cardboard’ reached the 100,000 hits milestone last week I decided to pick up a few of the cards that I had been watching.

Here is card #3

Molitor 78T 

Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2004, Paul Molitor had a brilliant 21-year career.  Never getting the opportunity to showcase his talents in front of a consistently large crowd, Molitor spent most of his career as an unheralded superstar.

With 3,316 career hits and a lifetime batting average of .306 Paul Molitor is one of the greatest hitters of the last 40 years.  For a player that was not classified as a ‘power hitter’ Molitor quietly bashed 234 home runs.  And while also never being classified as a ‘speedster’, Paul also accumulated 504 stolen bases.  This multi-dimensional player was a 7-time All-star, and he won 4 Silver Slugger awards as well.  Molitor finished in the Top 20 for the MVP award 9 times over the course of his career where his highest finish was coming in at 2nd place in 1993.

When Molitor got the opportunity to play in the World Series, he took full advantage and the world watched in awe.  Playing in the 1982 contest with the Brewers and then again in 1993 with the Blue Jays, Molitor put on a remarkable show.  In 13 games between the 2 series’, Molitor went 23 for 55 hitting a solid .418.  He also homered twice and drove in 11 runs.  Although his Brewers lost the championship in 1983, he did go on to win a title in 1993 and was voted World Series MVP for his dominant hitting performance in which he hit .500.

I Told You That I Was Going To Treat Myself – Part #2

Most collectors will look for any to find an excuse for buying more cards.  I am no different so when ’30-Year Old Cardboard’ reached the 100,000 hits milestone last week I decided to pick up a few of the cards that I had been watching.

Here is card #2

Morris 78T

Jack Morris was the picture of pitching excellence for the better part of his 18 year career in the majors.  With a career record of 254-186, one has to wonder how much closer to the 300 win milestone Morris would have come if he played on an elite team for a few years of his career.  Morris finished in the Top 9 for the Cy Young award 7 times.  He compiled (12) 15 win seasons and ended his career with 2,478 strikeouts.  Jack Morris may be best known for his post season performances in which he shined brightest amongst his teammates and competitors.  Morris competed in 3 World Series’ and won all 3 – 1984 with the Detroit Tigers, 1991 with the Minnesota Twins, and 1992 with the Toronto Blue Jays.  Morris ended his amazing World Series career with a 6-1 record as well as winning the 1991 World Series Most Valuable Player award.

I Told You That I Was Going To Treat Myself – Part #1

Most collectors will look for any to find an excuse for buying more cards.  I am no different so when ’30-Year Old Cardboard’ reached the 100,000 hits milestone last week I decided to pick up a few of the cards that I had been watching.

Here is card #1

Carter 75T

Had it not been for a player named Johnny Bench, Gary Carter may be considered the best catcher in baseball history.  In this case, 2nd place is not too bad of a spot to be in when you’re behind one the greatest players in major league history.

Gary Carter brought a level of offensive and defensive consistency to the catching position for 19 seasons.  An 11-time All-star, Carter was the team leader during his days with the Montreal Expos and New York Mets.  His solid offensive play, highlighted by winning 5 Silver Slugger awards, and his dominant defense in which he won 3 Gold Gloves established him as one of the most complete players during the 1970’s and into the 1980’s.  With a career batting average of .262, Carter captured 2,092 hits during his playing days.  And with 324 homers, 1,225 RBI, and 1,025 runs scored, Carter provided punch to the offense that was rare from the catcher’s position during those times.  Due to the rarity of this kind of production by a catcher, Gary Carter finished in the Top 17 for the MVP award 7 times during his career.

Gary Carter played in 1 World Series match-up in 1986 and his New York Mets won the title in 7 games.  During that series, Carter batted .276 while hitting 2 home runs and knocking in an amazing 9 runs.