Tag Archives: 1965 topps

Happy Birthday Jim ‘Catfish’ Hunter!!!

Happy Birthday Jim ‘Catfish’ Hunter!!!

Today we celebrate the birthday of Jim ‘Catfish’ Hunter.

Hunter’s Hall of Fame resume includes a 224-166 record.  Catfish pitched for 15 seasons in the big leagues and was an 8-time All-Star.  He won the Cy Young award in 1974 when he went 25-12 with a 2.49 ERA.  Catfish won 5 World Series rings – 3 with the Oakland A’s and 2 with the New York Yankees.

Happy Birthday ‘Catfish’!!!

Word Association Wednesday – When I Say ‘Cut Signatures’, You Say…

Word Association Wednesday – When I Say ‘Cut Signatures’, You Say…

From dictionary.com:

Word Association, Noun.  

Definition – the connection and production of other words in response to a given word, done spontaneously as a game, creative technique, or in a psychiatric evaluation.

Ex: Dog –> Bark

Topps’ 2014 Heritage product release has been re-scheduled to Friday, the 14th.  This is roughly ten days after the original launch date.  What this minor delay has done is give me a few more days to go after some of the Series 1 cards I still need, while also building my checklist for the Marlins and Player Collection cards in the Heritage set that I plan to go after.

After cruising through the base checklist, I was intrigued about the subsets found in this year’s release and ultimately that led me to reviewing the full set.

And then I ran into this – ‘1965 Cut Signatures’ and ‘1965 Celebrity Cut Signatures’.

And that immediately made me ask the question ‘When I Say ‘Cut Signatures, I Think’??

And my answer is:

YUCK

Cut Signature

I mean, seriously – Does anyone want a piece of index card or notebook paper mounted to a baseball card that features a signature that wasn’t intended to be there in the first place?

This set features autographs of baseball players like Brooks Robinson, Jim Palmer, and Tom Seaver as well as celebrities like Art Garfunkel, John Wayne, and Elvis Presley.  Wouldn’t you rather have a nice piece signed that was purposely signed by the person versus the item being manipulated to fit a baseball card?

I’m not sure where the majority stands on this, but I find the ‘Cut Signature’ to be as ridiculous as anything that has been tried by any baseball card producing company – EVER.

What do you think?   ‘When I Say ‘Cut Signatures, You Say….

‘Wednesday’s Word Association’ – When I Hear The Name “Topps Heritage”, I Think Of…

‘Wednesday’s Word Association’ – When I Hear The Name “Topps Heritage”, I Think Of…

From dictionary.com:

Word Association, Noun.  

Definition – the connection and production of other words in response to a given word, done spontaneously as a game, creative technique, or in a psychiatric evaluation.

Ex: Dog –> Bark

‘Wednesday’s Word Association’ – When I Hear The Name “Topps Heritage”, I Think Of…

Today is release day.  And on this day, the new 2014 Topps Heritage issue becomes available to collectors for the first time.

Many collectors are excited about this.  I am not one of them…  I’ll grab my Marlins team set, a few cards for my player collections and then I am done.  No packs, no box breaks, nada.

When I got back into the hobby of baseball card collecting 5 ½ years ago, I was immediately drawn to the Heritage theme as I always had a strong liking for vintage card design, especially the ones from my youth.  And I thought it would be neat to see modern players featured in modern sets with those old-school looks.  Topps’ Heritage, Archives, and Fan-Favorites give us precisely that.

But now, I am bored by most of it.  Sure, I like the idea.  But I think it has morphed into way more than it should be.  And it has invaded more and more products as the years have passed.

So, when I hear ‘Topps Heritage’, the first thing that I think of is ‘PLAYED OUT’.

Topps Heritage

If Topps kept this special, I think it would be so much better.  As much as I like insert sets and seeing modern players featured on classic baseball card designs, it is just too much right now.  And in my eyes, it has made the Heritage brand not as special as it should be.  Sure, the Heritage set is the one that truly pays homage to the full set from that collecting year, as is stays true to the card style, the variations, and errors, but as we get closer and closer to the Heritage sets that will honor the great sets of the 1970’s and 1980’s, we will have already seen modern Topps products that features the 1971, 1972, 1975, 1980, 1983, 1987, and many more card designs.

And it is at that point that I think that Topps Heritage will sink.

This is just my opinion, but if you are a Topps Heritage fan, I would suggest that you enjoy the next few years because once we get into the designs of the 1970’s, you’re going to feel like you’ve seen all of this before…

What do you think?  What Is The First Things When You Think Of When You Hear ‘Topps Heritage’?

Let me hear it!!

Jim ‘Catfish’ Hunter 2012 Topps Archives ’77 Cloth Stickers

Jim ‘Catfish’ Hunter 2012 Topps Archives ’77 Cloth Stickers

One of the things that I like most about this subset is that it looks like Topps made conscious efforts to give us images that worked with the 1977 theme.

Here is the most recent addition to my 2012 Topps Archives ’77 Cloth Stickers set, the card of Jim ‘Catfish’ Hunter:

CLOTH HUNTER

As you can see with the image used, you have Hunter in his old Yankees garb complete with a great pair of Black stirrups!

NICE.

Happy Birthday Jim ‘Catfish’ Hunter!!!

Happy Birthday Jim ‘Catfish’ Hunter!!!

Today we celebrate the birthday of Jim ‘Catfish’ Hunter.

Hunter’s Hall of Fame resume includes a 224-166 record.  Catfish pitched for 15 seasons in the big leagues and was an 8-time All-Star.  He won the Cy Young award in 1974 when he went 25-12 with a 2.49 ERA.  Catfish won 5 World Series rings – 3 with the Oakland A’s and 2 with the New York Yankees.

Happy Birthday ‘Catfish’!!!

Ron Santo ‘Fab Five’ – Card #2 – 1965 Topps

Ron Santo ‘Fab Five’ – Card #2 – 1965 Topps

Now that my Ron Santo collection is complete, it is time to show of my favorite five cards from the set.

Card #2 – 1965 Topps.

Man this card just screams vintage!

Probably my favorite set from the 1960’s, I really enjoy the simple, yet perfectly baseball themed design of the 1965 Topps set.

The team banner adds a great 3-D look to the card, while not taking away from the great, and large photo of the featured player.

And the Red outline works perfectly with the Cubs’ colors too!

Happy Birthday Jim ‘Catfish’ Hunter!!!

Happy Birthday Jim ‘Catfish’ Hunter!!!

Jim Hunter would have turned 65 years old today.

Hunter’s Hall of Fame resume includes a 224-166 record.  Catfish pitched for 15 seasons in the big leagues and was an 8-time All-Star.  He won the Cy Young award in 1974 when he went 25-12 with a 2.49 ERA.  Catfish won 5 World Series rings – 3 with the Oakland A’s and 2 with the New York Yankees.

Happy Birthday ‘Catfish’!!!

Joe Morgan 1965 Topps ROOKIE CARD!!!

Joe Morgan 1965 Topps ROOKIE CARD!!!

This one is long overdue…

I declared my desire to collect all of Joe Morgan’s baseball cards from his playing days more than six months ago.

That is when the wit began.  So, patiently, I waited.  and waited some more.  And then waited even more than that.

That patience finally paid off as I am now the proud owner of a 1965 Topps Joe Morgan rookie card.

Check it out:

In very good condition, I am so happy to finally bring this card into my collection.  When I start new player collections, I try to not let the money a single card may cost deter me from what I am trying to do.  I am trying to pay homage to my favorite players from prior generations so opting to not choose a player because his cards are too costly is not something I let affect my decisions.  Instead, I wait and hunt and seek out the best options. 

And that is what I did, and now I have a great, possibly the greatest Joe Morgan card for my collection that pays tribute to his magnificent career!!!

Thanks.

‘Same Card, Different Paths’ – Card #47

‘Same Card, Different Paths’ – Card #47

1965 Topps – Card #533 – AKA – ‘The Tug McGraw Rookie Card’

Danny Napoleon – Napoleon’s career spanned just 2 seasons and 80 games.  An outfielder, Napoleon found it hard to break into the Mets’ lineup on a regular basis.  Primarily used as a back-up or replacement in late innings, he only made 142 plate appearances during his playing days.  Napoleon has a career batting average of .162 along with 21 hits, 7 runs scored, and 7 RBI.

Ron Swaboda – A true ‘fan-favorite’, Swaboda’s career lasted 9 years – and all of them were spent in New York.   Splitting time between the Mets and Yankees, Swaboda saw decent success with both teams.  His greatest accomplishment was being part of the 1969 World Champion ‘Amazin Mets’ team.  In that series, Swaboda hit .400 as he collected 6 hits in 15 plate appearances.  He also scored a run, drove in a run, and drew a walk. 

Jim Bethke – Undefeated, clap, clap, clap, clap, clap!!!  Bethke made 25 appearances for the New York Mets during the 1968 season – and he is undefeated with a career record of 2-0!!  Bethke was used as a middle and long reliever, and eve though most of his statistics have inflated numbers, he can always claim to be one of major league baseball’s undefeated  pitchers!!

Tug McGraw – McGraw pitched in the big leagues for 19 seasons.  Splitting time between New York and Philadelphia, McGraw earned a 96-92 record.  Primarily used in relief, McGraw did find himself as a starter from time to time – and he as 5 complete games and 1 shutout to his credit.  McGraw is a 2-time All-star and was on the 1980 World Series winning Phillies.

‘Same Card, Different Paths’ – Card #28

‘Same Card, Different Paths’ – Card #28

1965 Topps – Card #526 – AKA – ‘The Jim “Catfish” Hunter Rookie Card’

Rene Lachemann – Lachemann’s major league career lasted just 3 seasons and 118 games.  A career .210 hitter, Lachemann amassed 59 hits during his playing days including 9 home runs, 9 doubles, 23 runs scored, and 29 RBI.

Johnny Odom – ‘Blue Moon’ Odom enjoyed a 13-season career and was selected as an All-Star during the 1968 and 1969 seasons.  Starting 229 games during his career, Odom retired with a 84-85 record.  He was a member of the Oakland A’s World Series championship teams in 1972, 1973, and 1974.  In those 3 championship match-ups, Odom was 1-1 with a 2.08 ERA in 17 innings pitched.

Skip Lockwood – Lockwood’s career spanned 12 seasons and 5 major league clubs.  A pitcher, Lockwood was used in both starting and relief roles during his playing days.  He has a career record of 57-97 with 68 saves. 

Jim Hunter – Hunter’s Hall of Fame resume includes a 224-166 record.  Catfish pitched for 15 seasons in the big leagues and was an 8-time All-Star.  He won the Cy Young award in 1974 when he went 25-12 with a 2.49 ERA.  Catfish won 5 World Series rings – 3 with the Oakland A’s and 2 with the New York Yankees.