Tag Archives: carney lansford

Happy Birthday Terry Steinbach!!!

Happy Birthday Terry Steinbach!!!

Terry Steinbach turns 52 years old today.

Terry Steinbach was the anchor for a very successful Oakland Athletics pitching staff during their ‘Glory Years’ of the late 1980’s.

A 3-time All-star catcher, Steinbach was the model of consistency both at the plate and on the field for what at the time was baseball’s most dynamic line-up.  During Steinbach’s 14-year career, he hit a solid .271 while amassing 162 home runs and driving in 745 runs.  On a line-up that consisted of the amazing talents of Rickey Henderson, Jose Canseco, Mark McGwire, Carney Lansford, Dave Henderson, and others, it was Steinbach’s approach at the plate that helped the A’s become the elite team of the 1980’s.

Steinbach also caught 2 no-hitters during his career: 1 in 1990 by A’s ace Dave Stewart & 1 in 1999 by Eric Milton of the Twins.

Terry Steinbach helped lead the A’s to 3 consecutive AL pennants in 1988, 1989, and 1990.  The pinnacle was reached in 1989 as the Oakland A’s won the World Series in a 4-game sweep of the San Francisco Giants.

In Steinbach’s first year of Hall of Fame eligibility in 2000 he received 1 vote and was dropped from all future ballots.

Happy Birthday Mr. Steinbach!!

Terry Steinbach 2004 Topps All-Time Fan Favorites

Terry Steinbach 2004 Topps All-Time Fan Favorites

Terry Steinbach was one of the unsung heroes of that dynamic Oakland Athletics squad in the lat 1980’s and early 1990’s.

As the team’s catcher, he helped guide the pitching staff to three consecutive World Series appearances in 1988, 1989, and 1990.

Steinbach was a 3-time All-Star with the A’s, and his best statistical season came in 1993.  During that campaign, Steinbach hit .285, while collecting 111 hits, 19 doubles, 10 home runs, 43 RBI, and 47 runs scored.

It’s nice to see this card from the ‘Fan Favorites’ set pay homage to that great season!!!

Happy Birthday Terry Steinbach!!!

Happy Birthday Terry Steinbach!!!

Terry Steinbach turns 50 years old today.

Terry Steinbach was the anchor for a very successful Oakland Athletics pitching staff during their ‘Glory Years’ of the late 1980’s.

A 3-time All-star catcher, Steinbach was the model of consistency both at the plate and on the field for what at the time was baseball’s most dynamic line-up.  During Steinbach’s 14-year career, he hit a solid .271 while amassing 162 home runs and driving in 745 runs.  On a line-up that consisted of the amazing talents of Rickey Henderson, Jose Canseco, Mark McGwire, Carney Lansford, Dave Henderson, and others, it was Steinbach’s approach at the plate that helped the A’s become the elite team of the 1980’s.

Steinbach also caught 2 no-hitters during his career: 1 in 1990 by A’s ace Dave Stewart & 1 in 1999 by Eric Milton of the Twins.

Terry Steinbach helped lead the A’s to 3 consecutive AL pennants in 1988, 1989, and 1990.  The pinnacle was reached in 1989 as the Oakland A’s won the World Series in a 4-game sweep of the San Francisco Giants.

In Steinbach’s first year of Hall of Fame eligibility in 2000 he received 1 vote and was dropped from all future ballots.

Happy Birthday Mr. Steinbach!!

Happy Birthday Terry Steinbach!!!

Happy Birthday Terry Steinbach!!!

Terry Steinbach turns 49 years old today.

Terry Steinbach was the anchor for a very successful Oakland Athletics pitching staff during their ‘Glory Years’ of the late 1980’s. 

A 3-time All-star catcher, Steinbach was the model of consistency both at the plate and on the field for what at the time was baseball’s most dynamic line-up.  During Steinbach’s 14-year career, he hit a solid .271 while amassing 162 home runs and driving in 745 runs.  On a line-up that consisted of the amazing talents of Rickey Henderson, Jose Canseco, Mark McGwire, Carney Lansford, Dave Henderson, and others, it was Steinbach’s approach at the plate that helped the A’s become the elite team of the 1980’s. 

Steinbach also caught 2 no-hitters during his career: 1 in 1990 by A’s ace Dave Stewart & 1 in 1999 by Eric Milton of the Twins.

Terry Steinbach helped lead the A’s to 3 consecutive AL pennants in 1988, 1989, and 1990.  The pinnacle was reached in 1989 as the Oakland A’s won the World Series in a 4-game sweep of the San Francisco Giants.

 In Steinbach’s first year of Hall of Fame eligibility in 2000 he received 1 vote and was dropped from all future ballots.

Happy Birthday Mr. Steinbach!!

What Ever Happened To Terry Steinbach???

Terry Steinbach was the anchor for a very successful Oakland Athletics pitching staff during their ‘Glory Years’ of the late 1980’s. 

A 3-time All-star catcher, Steinbach was the model of consistency both at the plate and on the field for what at the time was baseball’s most dynamic line-up.  During Steinbach’s 14-year career, he hit a solid .271 while amassing 162 home runs and driving in 745 runs.  On a line-up that consisted of the amazing talents of Rickey Henderson, Jose Canseco, Mark McGwire, Carney Lansford, Dave Henderson, and others, it was Steinbach’s approach at the plate that helped the A’s become the elite team of the 1980’s. 

Steinbach also caught 2 no-hitters during his career: 1 in 1990 by A’s ace Dave Stewart & 1 in 1999 by Eric Milton of the Twins.

Terry Steinbach helped lead the A’s to 3 consecutive AL pennants in 1988, 1989, and 1990.  The pinnacle was reached in 1989 as the Oakland A’s won the World Series in a 4-game sweep of the San Francisco Giants.

 In Steinbach’s first year of Hall of Fame eligibility in 2000 he received 1 vote and was dropped from all future ballots.

steinback

“31 in 31” – The 1970’s – Card #31

 “31 in 31” – The 1970’s – Card #31

Carney Lansford – 1979 Topps – #212

Lansford let his bat do the talking during the course of his career.  With a lifetime .290 batting average, Carney Lansford dominated American League pitching for the better part of 15 major league seasons.  Coupled with 5 .300+ seasons, Lansford won the batting title in 1981 with a .336 average.  Carney Lansford competed in 3 World Series match-ups from 1988-1990, winning one title in 1989 with the Oakland Athletics.  In 8 career postseason series’, Lansford shined with a .305 batting average totaling 39 hits in 33 games.

lansford

Ticket Stub #7 – White Sox vs. Oakland A’s – 06/16/1990

Ticket Stub #7 – White Sox vs. Oakland A’s – 06/16/1990

Oakland 12 – White Sox 3

This game was big thrill for me.  The Oakland A’s had been to 2 straight World Series – winning 1 and losing 1.  To be able to see a team in it’s prime was extremely exciting.  Adding to that, their roster featured some of my favorite players – Rickey Henderson, Carney Lansford, Mark McGwire, and Terry Steinbach.

There was no bigger highlight than watching Rickey Henderson hit a home run!!!

 

Oakland A’s AB R H RBI BB SO BA NOTES
R. Henderson 3 2 2 1 1 0 0.335 HR
Blankenship 1 0 0 1 1 1 0.073  
D. Henderson 5 1 2 2 0 0 0.246  
Hassey 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.183  
Sanderson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.000  
Klink 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.000  
Lansford 4 0 1 0 1 1 0.283  
Randolph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.230  
McGwire 5 2 2 1 1 0 0.235  
Steinbach 4 3 3 3 0 0 0.232 HR
Quirk 2 1 2 0 0 0 0.227  
Jennings 5 1 2 2 1 1 0.179  
Howard 6 1 1 0 0 2 0.167  
Weiss 3 1 2 1 2 0 0.293  
Gallego 4 0 0 0 1 0 0.206  
                 
White Sox AB R H RBI BB SO BA NOTES
Johnson 5 0 1 0 0 0 0.280  
Ventura 3 1 2 1 1 0 0.220  
Gallagher 1 0 1 0 0 0 0.226  
Calderon 4 0 1 0 0 0 0.304  
Martinez 0 0 0 0 1 0 0.209  
Pasqua 5 0 1 1 0 1 0.319  
Fisk 2 0 1 0 0 0 0.272  
Karkovice 2 0 1 0 0 0 0.241  
Kittle 4 0 0 0 0 0 0.251  
Sosa 4 1 2 0 0 0 0.256  
Fletcher 4 1 2 1 0 1 0.234  
Guillen 2 0 0 0 0 0 0.332  
Grebeck 2 0 0 0 0 1 0.120  

 

I Stopped By A Card Shop Tonight and…

For the first time in 15 years, I went into a baseball card shop.  Actually, the neon sign on the window said ‘Card Shop’ but I was more than surprised by what I found inside…

The parking lot was pretty empty but the store was packed.  It was a little after 4PM and the store was full of young teenage boys gathered around table after table playing with these Japanese Anime cards.  I would estimate that 80% of the merchandise inside was of this same kind of product.   The remainder was supplies and a small assortment of baseball cards. 

Is this a true reflection of what my beloved pastime has transitioned to?  I am all for kids using their imagination, but part of the fun of sports and sports card collecting is trying to emulate what your faorite players do on the field.

Anyway, I went to the store for 2 things.  (1)Storage and (2)to see what kinds of cards they had from the 80’s.  All of my previous purchases have been through Ebay to this point so I was eager to see what they had.  The display cases were nice and certainly contained cards that would be recognizable to most collectors.  But, I was not overwhelmed with the selection and will probably use Ebay as my primary source for cards in the future. 

I spent a total of $3.75 on 9 cards.  I’m not going to keep them in business with my purchase, but it doesn’t really seem like they are interested in making money selling baseball cards either.  Here’s what I picked up:

More on why I selected these cards later…  stay tuned for that post!

At the register, they had some Marlins cards and that’s when I saw this Cameron Maybin card so I picked it up too.

Wade Boggs was going to be ‘The One’

As a kid, I remember watching Pete Rose break Ty Cobb’s record for career hits with 4,192.  Even at a young age, I understood that it would take supreme dedication and skill for anyone to amass that many hits in a career.  I sat in awe not knowing Rose’s full story, but was amazed by the history I was watching.

Enter Wade Boggs.  I had always been fascinated by Boggs and his hitting abilities.  He batted 2nd or 3rd in the Red Sox line up, as I did in Little League at the time.  He was a confident hitter and had amazing patience at the plate, as I tried to have in Little League at the time.  He played 3rd base, as I did in Little League at the time.

Ok, so I was completely convinced that of all of the great hitters I was watching(Gwynn, Mattingly, Lansford, etc), it was going to be Wade Boggs that would eventually break Pete Rose’s new hits record.  By 1989, and 8 seasons into his career, Boggs had 1,597 hits.  Over the first 8 years of Rose’s career, Pete had amassed 1,532.  Boggs was well onto his way of becoming the best hitter in major league history.  Over the course of the next 8 seasons, Rose got another 1,632 while Boggs only accumulated 1,203.  My dreams were shattered as I watched this goal grow farther and farther out of reach.  While Rose seemed to only get better as he aged, Boggs showed more and more signs of an aging ballplayer and was unable to keep up with Rose’s pace.

Remarkably enough, Boggs finished up 1,246 hits shy of tying Rose for the all-time hits record.  And this just goes to show that the talent of these baseball players is so incredibly rare.   And when you find a player that is able to outlast and withstand all obstacles that come his way during his career that is a true accomplishment.

Wade Boggs will always be one of my favorite players.  I admire his approach to game, and specifically to the science of hitting.  I do hope that as he gets older people mention his name as one of the greatest hitters of all-time.   I know I will…

Whatever Happened to Carney Lansford???

“Paging Mr. Lansford.  Carney Lansford, please call the Operator.”

Lansford was a hitting machine for most of his career, yet he seemed to have disappeared into thin air after the 1992 season.  When checking the batting leaders in the paper, Carney was always near the top in the American League right alongside Wade Boggs and Don Mattingly. 

Lansford was a huge part of Oakland’s success in the late 80’s.  While the spotlight went to Jose Canseco, Mark McGwire, and Rickey Henderson, it was Lansford that was keeping the team afloat with his consistent approach at the plate.  In 15 years, he compiled over 2,000 hits averaging 133+ per year.  And with Oakland, he soared above those numbers and averaged 146+ hits per year over 9 seasons.  In 1991 he only played in 5 games yet managed to comeback in 1992 and record another 130 hits in his final season as a professional ballplayer. 

While most players are happy to collect a paycheck and accept a role as a reserve, Lansford just dropped off the radar altogether.  The oddest part about his sudden disappearance from the game is that Oakland didn’t have a ‘hot shot’ coming in to replace Carney.  Over the next 3 years the A’s used Craid Paquette, Scott Brosius, and again Craig Paquette at third.  Neither of these guys amounted to anything special in basball so you have to wonder why Lansford left while not being pushed out the door.  Needless to say, Carney’s approach to the game and specifically to hitting is one of the big reasons for Oakland’s rapid decline after his departurre.

Surely somebody could have used a DH with his abilities, right?  This was long before the DH was dominated by players that were not good defenders but excelled as hitters.  Guys like Frank Thomas, David Ortiz, and Gary Sheffield are not what you would find as a DH back in the 80’s.  Lansford would have been a great bat to add to any line-up and surely would have provided a nice spark as a pinch hitter when given the chance.

Today Lasnford is a hitting coach with the San Francisco Giants.  It’s only a matter of time before the team’s batting climbs due to the instruction of Mr. Lansford.