Tag Archives: greg maddux

1994 HEADLINE: Greg Maddux Wins Third Straight Cy Young Award

1994 HEADLINE: Greg Maddux Wins Third Straight Cy Young Award

On this day in 1994, Greg Maddux won his third straight Cy Young award.  He was the first pitcher in major league history to earn the award in three consecutive seasons.

Being one of the best pitchers in the sport over that length of time is a major accomplishment.  And when some of your greatest competition is coming from your teammates, I am sure that the pride of being the ‘Ace’ of the staff gave Maddux even more gratification.

Here is a look at Maddux’s numbers from those three seasons:

1992 – 20-11, 2.18 ERA, 9 complete games, All-Star, Gold Glove

1993 – 20-10, 2.36 ERA, 10 complete games, Gold Glove

1994 – 16-6, 1.56 ERA, 10 complete games, All-Star, Gold Glove

Oh, and it should be noted that Maddux went on to win the Cy Young award in 1995 too – setting an all-time record with four consecutive wins!!

Happy Anniversary Mr. Maddux!!!

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Happy Birthday Greg Maddux!!!

Happy Birthday Greg Maddux!!!

Greg Maddux turns 48 years old today.

Greg Maddux was the epitome of a hard-working pitcher.  His talent was immense and he often came across as a calm and relaxed guy.  But once Maddux took the mound, he was all about business and he excelled at a record pace.

After 23 seasons in the big leagues, Greg Maddux retired with 355 wins and 277 loses.  He has pitched over 5,000 innings during the course of his career while starting 740 games.  In his 23 seasons, Maddux threw 35 shutouts and pitched 109 complete games.

For his career, Maddux won 15 or more games in 18 of his 23 seasons; 17 of them being consecutive.  Maddux won 20 or more in 2 seasons.  He also eclipsed the 3,000 strikeout plateau with 3,371 career K’s.  His ERA at the end of his career was 3.16.

As a pitcher in the National League for the course of his career, Maddux had a career batting average of .171.  While considered to be a pretty good hitting-pitcher, Maddux hit 5 home runs and drove in 84 runs.  He has 272 hits, 103 runs scored, and 11 stolen bases to his credit.

Greg Maddux won 4 consecutive Cy Young Awards.  And in 9 straight seasons from 1992-1990, he placed in the Top 3 for the award 8 times.  Greg Maddux is an 8-time All-star and has won 18 Gold Gloves for his dominance as a defensive pitcher.

In his best season of 1995, Maddux went 19-2 while throwing 10 complete games and 3 shutouts.  In that season, his ERA was an amazing 1.63 and he struck out 181 batters while walking just 23.  In that year Maddux won his 4th and final Cy Young award, a Gold Glove, and was an All-star.

Greg Maddux was played in 3 World Series contests while winning 1 championship title.  In 1995 his Atlanta Braves were victorious.  Maddux started 2 games in that match-up as he won 1 game and lost 1 game.  In 16 innings of work, he struck out 8 batters and allowed 4 runs.

He is a member of the 2014 Baseball Hall of Fame class.

Happy Birthday ‘Professor’!!

The Evolution Of My Collection – Part 16

The Evolution Of My Collection – Part 16

It has been a long time since I did one of these ‘Evolution’ posts, so I thought it would be a good time to get back and take a peek at my full collection with one single, solitary picture.

The growth of my collection over the last few months has stalled a bit as I have focused more time, energy, and funds into my modern player collections and the start of my 1975 Topps set build.

Still, while the growth in terms of size is not what it has been in the past, the growth of these player collections has been phenomenally fun!!

Between my Dustin Pedroia, Andrew McCutchen, Jose Fernandez, Bryce Harper and Giancarlo Stanton collections, each has grown by leaps and bounds.  And while I never thought that I would truly get ‘into’ collecting modern players, I am happy about how rewarding this has been thus far.  And I look forward to seeing how much I can grow each of them in the coming collecting year.

Also, as you can see in the below picture, the three albums that I have dedicated to my Marlins teams sets have filled up nicely.  I don’t yet need to expand to a fourth album, but that may be my reality by the end of 2014.

Lastly, you will also see the binder I am using for my 1975 Topps set build in the lower right corner of the picture.  I have all of the pages pre-loaded, and I am trying to keep it as organized as possible so as I add new cards to my set, I can quickly drop them into the spots reserved for them.

Evolution

 

Next time around I will not wait this long to show of the full collection.  It has been too long and I truly enjoy keeping this process rolling as it is a nice way to celebrate the growth and progress of ’30-YOC’.

Oh, and someday soon I see my ‘Ultimate Dawson’ expanding to a fourth box…

Thanks for reading.  Have a nice night.

Million Dollar Question – What Is The Ultimate Greg Maddux Rookie Card?

Million Dollar Question – What Is The Ultimate Greg Maddux Rookie Card?

After the announcement of Greg Maddux’s election to the Baseball Hall Of Fame, I saw a pretty decent spike in the number of Greg Maddux related new listings on Ebay.  Surely, this was a move by the non-Maddux collector to take advantage and strike while Maddux’s name was once again highly relevant in the hobby.

This also made me smile as my Greg Maddux player collection was completed a few years ago and I would not have to sift through any price-gouging tactics in order to capture cards for my collection.

As you would expect, Maddux cards began to sell again at a pretty good pace. And the prices went from fair to overpriced to outrageous.

This got me to thinking ‘What Is The Ultimate Greg Maddux Rookie Card’?

So, that is tonight’s Million Dollar Question.

While there are not a ton of choices, there is a decent lot to choose from.

Here they are:

1987 Topps Traded

maddux 1987 topp

1987 Fleer Updated

maddux 1987 fleer update

1987 Donruss Rated Rookie

maddux 1987 rated rookie

1987 Donruss ‘The Rookies’

maddux 1987 the rookies

Not a bad crop of cards.  And I am happy to say that I own a copy of each in my collection.

But, which one is the ‘Ultimate One’?

Hmmm….  Decisions, decisions….

Amazingly, none of these Maddux cards made it to my ‘Fab 5’ when I completed my player collection a few years back.  The reason is simple – I don’t have too many memories of the shaggy haired pitcher with the weak mustache.  Instead, I recall the professor-esque looking guy with the business man’s haircut and slightly chubby face.

Back to the cards…  My favorite card among the four options is the Fleer Update card.  The colors from the 1987 Fleer design are very complementary to those of the Chicago Cubs.  And with the backdrop of a blurred Wrigley Field being present, the Maddux image has a nice 3-D effect happening.

So, my choice is the 1987 Fleer Update card!

maddux 1987 fleer update

And now it is your turn – What Is The Ultimate Greg Maddux Rookie Card?

Did You Know…

No player in major league history has earned more Gold Glove Awards than Greg Maddux.  During his 23-year big league career, Maddux won an unreal 18 Gold Glove Awards for his defensive excellence from the pitching mound.

greg maddux

Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, And Frank Thomas Elected To The Hall Of Fame

Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, And Frank Thomas Elected To The Hall Of Fame

From MLB.com

NEW YORK — One of the most majestic induction classes in the history of the National Baseball Hall of Fame was set on Wednesday with the announcement that Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and Frank Thomas were elected by eligible writers of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America the first time they were on the ballot, all of them by big margins.

On the ballot for the second time, Craig Biggio, who had 3,060 hits in 20 seasons, all with the Astros, did not get the necessary 75 percent, falling 0.2 percent shy of induction and missing by a scant two votes.

The newly elected trio will attend an 11 a.m. ET news conference on Thursday at the Waldorf Astoria New York that will be simulcast on MLB.com and MLB Network.

Also to be inducted in July are three of the greatest managers of all time — Bobby Cox, Joe Torre and Tony La Russa — all selected by the Expansion Era Committee last month. They rank third, fourth and fifth in managerial victories in Major League history, each winning more than 2,000 games.

The Braves trio of Maddux, Glavine and Cox will be front and center in this, the 75th anniversary of the museum, during the ceremony behind the Clark Sports Center on July 27.

“It’s very humbling to go in with these guys,” said Maddux, who combined with Glavine to win 660 games. “It’s just icing on the cake. It’s going to be a special day and I’m going to be able to share it with special people.”

Thomas — who batted .301, hit 521 homers and amassed 1,704 RBIs in 19 seasons, 16 of them with the White Sox — is the first Hall of Famer to have played a majority of his games as a designated hitter. He appeared in 2,322 career games, with 1,351 coming as a DH and 971 at first base. Paul Molitor, who was elected in 2004, played more of his games as a DH than at any other position, but still just 44 percent of his total games played.

“This has been a stressful 48 hours. I am so excited that I’m in the Hall of Fame,” Thomas said. “This is something that I will have to sit back in the next three or four days and figure it out, because you can only dream so big, and this is as big as it gets for me. I’m a Georgia kid. Going in with Glavine, Maddux and Bobby Cox means a lot to me. The whole state of Georgia is going to be there, and I am just so blessed that I’ll be able to be there with these guys.”

 

That means six living members are heading toward one of the grandest Induction Weekends, from July 26-27, in Cooperstown, N.Y. The results of this year’s BBWAA vote were in stark contrast to that of last year, when the writers didn’t elect anyone.

Maddux and Glavine, a pair of 300-game winners who pitched the bulk of their careers for the Braves, were the favorites, but the 571 voters outdid themselves by also adding Thomas and coming so close on Biggio. It was the first time since 1999 — when Robin Yount, Nolan Ryan and George Brett were elected — that the writers put three first-time eligibles into the Hall.

Maddux, who won 355 games, the eighth-highest figure in Major League history, had 97.2 percent of the vote, failing to appear on 16 of the 571 ballots cast.

Glavine, who won 305 games, fourth-most among left-handers, was at 91.9 percent, and Thomas finished at 83.7.

Jack Morris, who won 254 games during his 18-year big league career and World Series titles with the Tigers, Twins and Blue Jays, didn’t make it in his 15th and final time on the writers’ ballot. He actually lost ground, falling to 61.5 percent from last year’s 67.7. Morris, who will be eligible for the Expansion Era Committee consideration in the fall of 2016, is only the second player in history to amass in excess of 60 percent of the vote at some point over his 15 years of eligibility and not make the Hall via the writers’ ballot. Gil Hodges is the other.

Maddux and Glavine are the only first-ballot pitchers to be elected together since Walter Johnson and Christy Mathewson were part of the inaugural class of 1936 along with Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb and Honus Wagner. They are the first living pair of 300-win pitchers to be elected in the same year and only the third pair in Hall of Fame history. The last starter to be elected by the BBWAA was Bert Blyleven in 2011, his 14th year of eligibility.

“It’s something I’m still trying to figure out how I feel,” Glavine said. “I’m just really humbled by the whole experience so far. I’m really excited about this whole process and this opportunity. I’m looking forward to it all. The opportunity to go in the Hall of Fame is one thing, but the opportunity to go in with two guys who were a very big part of my career means a lot to me.”

The Hall hasn’t inducted as many as six living baseball greats at the same time since 1971. Eleven were inducted in 1939, the year the red-brick museum opened its doors on Main Street, but they were from the first four classes, elected beginning in 1936. Last year, the three inductees elected by the Pre-Integration Committee — Yankees seminal owner Jacob Ruppert, catcher Deacon White and umpire Hank O’Day — were all deceased.

Maddux also pitched 10 seasons for the Cubs and had brief stays with the Padres and Dodgers at the end of his career. Glavine spent 17 seasons with the Braves and five with the Mets, for whom he won his 300th game. Cox managed Atlanta for 25 seasons and the Blue Jays for four, finishing with the Braves in 2010. John Smoltz, the third prong for a decade in that Atlanta rotation and who played 20 of his 21 seasons with the Braves, is slated to be on the ballot for the first time next year and has a very good chance of joining the trio.

“It was obvious with me and Glav, because we both retired at the same time and the managers go in in a different way,” said Maddux about the chances of being inducted at the same time as Glavine and Cox. “As soon as Bobby got in, I knew it had a chance of it being very special. He was there for half of my career and taught me so much about the game. It was a special honor for me to work under Bobby and play half of my career with Glav as well. The only thing that split it up is that Smoltzy played one more year.”

The July 26 awards ceremony at Doubleday Field stands to be formidable as well, with former catcher and longtime TV announcer Joe Garagiola Sr. receiving the Buck O’Neil Lifetime Achievement Award, longtime magazine writer Roger Angell selected by the BBWAA as the winner of the J.G. Taylor Spink Award for a career of meritorious baseball writing, and Rangers radio play-by-play man Eric Nadel earning the Ford C. Frick Award for excellence in broadcasting.

A year ago, when Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Sammy Sosa and Mike Piazza — players whose careers spanned baseball’s era of performance-enhancing drug use — made their initial appearances on the ballot, no one was elected by the writers for the first time since 1996, and only the second time since ’71.

Writers again rejected those players, with Piazza leading the pack at 62.2 percent, up from 58.7 percent last year. Clemens and Bonds had their percentages go down marginally to 35.4 and 34.7, respectively, but Sosa, who blasted 609 home runs and is the only player to have hit at least 60 homers in each of three seasons, slipped to 7.2 percent, barely remaining on the ballot.

Rafael Palmeiro, who failed a Major League Baseball-administered drug test in 2005, fell to 4.4 percent and was among 15 players to drop off the ballot. Palmeiro, with 569 homers and 3,020 hits, is one of only four players in history to amass both 500 homers and 3,000 hits. The other three are Hall of Famers Hank Aaron, Willie Mays and Eddie Murray.

A player must draw at least five percent of the vote each year to remain on the ballot for a maximum of 15 years.

Bonds is the all-time leader with 762 homers in his career and 73 in a single season. Clemens had 354 wins, one fewer than Maddux, and Piazza hit 396 of his 427 homers as a catcher — the most of any player at that position in Major League history.

Maddux said Bonds was the toughest hitter he ever faced in his career, but hesitated to opine on his status. Thomas, always regarded as one of the clean players of the era, said he harbors no animosity.

“I don’t fault anyone, I don’t fault anyone for what they did,” Thomas said. “But I went about it the right way. It was more about my family teaching me the right things. When I look at their numbers, I go, “Wow!” but I think if I hadn’t been hurt for 3 1/2 years, my numbers would have been right up there with them.”

Biggio seems to be on a clear course toward a plaque. Of the 26 other retired players who amassed 3,000 or more hits, only two are not in the Hall, and both suffer from extenuating circumstances, Palmeiro having failed a drug test and Pete Rose, the all-time leader with 4,256 hits, is banned from baseball because of gambling and is not eligible to be included on Hall of Fame ballots.

In a statement, Biggio said he was disappointed to not get in, tying Nellie Fox in 1985 and Pie Traynor in 1947 for the smallest margin of missing election in balloting history. But history is on his side. Traynor was elected in 1948. Fox was in his last year on the ballot when he fell two votes shy and was subsequently elected by the Veterans Committee in 1997.

“Congratulations to Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and Frank Thomas,” Biggio said. “Obviously, I’m disappointed to come that close. I feel for my family, the organization and the fans. Hopefully, next year.”

Biggio went from 68.2 percent in 2013 to 74.8 percent this year, right on the cusp.

“As surprised as I was last year that he didn’t get in, you almost feel heartbroken this year to be as close as he was,” Glavine said. “Craig was a tremendous competitor and had the respect of all of us who played against him. I think it’s just a matter of time before he’s in the Hall of Fame. I’m sure he’s disappointed today, having come so close, but I’m extremely confident that someday we’re going to watch him go through the same process.”

Glavine Maddux Thomas

Players & Picks For The ‘Greg Maddux Hall Of Fame Contest’

Players & Picks For The ‘Greg Maddux Hall Of Fame Contest’

Well friends, we are just a few hours away from the Baseball Hall of Fame announcing who has been elected to represent the Class of 2014.

And with that announcement, we will also have a winner for my contest.

Again, the player coming closest to the actual percentage of votes that Greg Maddux receives, without going over, will be the winner.

Here are the players:

Player Pick
irondequoit36 85.4
unclemoe 88.0
eric 91.0
BamattyP 91.7
gerad 92
pancuco 92.1
jared w 92.7
fuji 93.2
play at the plate 93.9
jeff p 94.2
scott o 94.6
scott 95.2
rich 95.3
spiegel 95.5
adam 95.8
john h 96.0
30-YOC** 96.1
q 96.4
ron 96.8
mgrlr 97.1
jeff 97.2
kelly 97.3
henry 97.6
defgav 97.8
matt w 98
nick 98.2
rob 98.3
ryan 98.6
jt 98.8
zebulon 98.8
charley8 99.2
wrigley regular 99.2
tom s 99.8
matt d 99.9
hackenbush 100.0

You’ll see that I put my name into the hat at 96.1%.  My vote does not count, but I could not resist playing – this was fun!

And here is one more look at the prize:

Maddux Contest

Good luck everyone.  And good luck to Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, Frank Thomas, Craig Biggio, Mike Piazza, and the other possible electees.