Tag Archives: hitting coach

What Ever Happened To Dave Magadan???

Like most players that are brought in through the New York Mets organization, the expectations put on Dave Magadan to be the saving grace of the team were immense.  Magadan had already built an impressive resume as a collegiate player as he dominated for the University of Alabama while winning several individual awards as well as taking his team to the College World Series.

Drafted in the 1st round by the Mets in 1983, Magadan was on his way to a starring role with the team.  Unfortunately for him, the Mets had a veteran and productive player at 3rd base in Howard Johnson.  Magadan was also capable of playing 1st base, but that role was occupied by Keith Hernandez – one of the best defensive first basemen in baseball history.  Still, the Mets wanted Magadan in their line-up and constantly tinkered with the roster to get him more playing time.  Never able to take over a position on a full-time basis did not seem to slow down Magadan’s production.  In just 85 games in 1987, he hit .318.  The next year he batted .277 in 112 games.  And then in 1989 he hit .286 while playing in 127 contests.

Dave Magadan’s best season was in 1990 where he played in 144 games – the most for 1 season in his entire career.  That year, Magadan hit .328 while driving in 72 runs and scoring 74. 

Of his 16 years in the big leagues, the first 7 years of Dave Magadan’s career were spent with the Mets.  The next 9 were spread over 6 more teams.  Magadan never regained his starring role on any of his new teams, yet he still performed well.  In the 9 seasons after he and the Mets parted ways, Magadan hit .275 or better 4 times. 

He ended his career with a lifetime batting average of .288 and 1,197 hits.  Never known as a power hitter, his career home run tally rests at 42.  But Magadan was productive – he scored 516 runs in his 16-season career while driving in 495.

Dave Magadan never made it to the World Series as a player.  But as a batting coach with the Boston Red Sox, Magadan won a World Series title in 2007. 

magadan

What Ever Happened To Gary Gaetti???

Gary Gaetti was a huge part of the Minnesota Twins’ success during the late 1980’s and into the 1990’s.  Although he played for 6 teams during his 19-year career, it was in Minnesota where he earned his reputation as a solid major league player.

Gaetti’s debut led off with a smash – literally.  In his first at bat in the big leagues, Gaetti homered.  And in the 10 seasons that followed, all with the Twins, Gaetti smacked 16 or more home runs during 8 of those seasons.  A lifetime .255 hitter, Gaetti made a career for himself as a power hitter that was able to drive in tons of runs.  With 360 career home runs and 1,341 RBI to his credit it’s easy to see why ‘The Rat’ was the anchor for many of the offensive lineups he was a part of.

Gaetti was also a stellar defensive player.  A 4-time Gold Glove winner at 3rd base, Gaetti’s desire to stop everything hit in his direction made him a fan favorite.  Always willing to put his body on the line to stop a ball from getting by him was an attribute that Gaetti used as one of the Twins’ leaders.

During the 1987 playoffs against the Tigers, Gaetti won the ALDS MVP award as he homered in his first 2 at-bats.  At the time, he was the only player to do this in the history of the game until matched by Evan Longoria in 2008.  Gaetti’s lone World Series appearance came in that same 1987 season when the Twins won the championship in 7 games.  In that series Gaetti hit .259 while collecting 7 hits, including 1 home run, and 4 RBI.

After retiring for the game, Gaetti put his offensive tools to work and became a hitting instructor.  Today he serves as the hitting coach for the Durham Bulls, a minor league affiliate of the Tampa Bay Rays.

I wonder why they call Gaetti ‘The Rat’…

gaetti

What Ever Happened To Kevin Seitzer???

Kevin Seitzer made his major league baseball debut by tearing up American League pitching in 161 games in 1987.  In Seitzer’s rookie season he compiled 207 hits while finishing the season with a .323 batting average.  Seitzer also made the All-Star team in his rookie season and finished second in the Rookie Of The Year voting to Oakland’s Mark McGwire.

Seitzer maintained his impressive hitting for 12 season in the big leagues.  He finished his career with a solid .295 batting average with 1,557 total hits.

Like many rookies from the 1980’s Seitzer was never able to repeat the success he enjoyed during his rookie season.  Even though he finished his career with 6 seasons of  hitting .300 or better, he never did maintain the league-wide popularity that he had in his first big league season.

Kevin Seitzer was on his way to becoming a baseball superstar.  Had he played in a major market, who knows how much more exposure he would have gained.  But playing professional baseball in such small market cities as Kansas City, Milwaukee, Oakland, and Cleveland is not the road map to success or baseball popularity.

In 2006 Seitzer was a hitting coach for the Arizona Diamond Backs.  When the 2009 season begins, Seitzer will be the hitting coach for the team he enjoyed most of his success with – The Kansas City Royals.

seitzer