Tag Archives: Jeff Kent

Happy Birthday Jeff Kent!!

Happy Birthday Jeff Kent!!

Jeff Kent turns 46 years old today.

Jeff Kent may go down as one of the most talented offensive second basemen in baseball history.  And his 2000 MVP season was sensational.  During that year, Kent hit .334 as he collected 196 hits.  He crushed 33 homers, drove in 125 runs, and scored 114 times.  He was a member of the All-star team that year and won the first of his four Silver Slugger trophies too.

Now eligible for the Hall of Fame, Kent is going through the process of accumulating votes for enshrinement.  Time will tell if he gets elected, but his offensive numbers as a second baseman are certainly worth consideration.

His career numbers look like this – 2,461 hits, .290 lifetime batting average, 560 doubles, 377 home runs, 1,320 runs scored, 1,518 RBI, and 4,246 total bases.  He is a 5-time All-Star, a 4-time Silver Slugger winner, and a former League MVP.

Happy Birthday Mr. Kent!

Hall Of Fame Debate: Assessing Jeff Kent’s Vote Tally From His First Ballot

Hall Of Fame Debate: Assessing Jeff Kent’s Vote Tally From His First Ballot

After analyzing the complete 2014 Baseball Hall of Fame voting results, it was Mike Mussina’s name that I was most shocked by with the final number of votes received.  Right behind Mussina, was Jeff Kent.

While never a superstar or household name, Jeff Kent was often regarded as ‘the best offensive player at his position’.  His stretch from 1997-2005 was superb.

On his first ballot, Kent received just 87 votes earning him 15.2% of the required 75% needed for election to Cooperstown.

So, where does Jeff Kent go from here?  Can he make up the vast ground that separates him and the needed votes to be elected?

Kent is the all-time leader in home runs hit for a second baseman with 377 career round-trippers.  When compared to all other second baseman in the Hall of Fame, Kent ranks in third place with 1,518 RBI behind Nap Lajoe and Rogers Hornsby.  His lifetime batting average of .290 is five points higher than that of Ryne Sandberg and nineteen points higher than Joe Morgan.

Kent was a 5-time All-Star and a 4-time Silver Slugger winner.  He was a league MVP in 2000 and had three other ‘Top 9′ seasons for the award.

What I think the biggest argument about Kent’s career is when his numbers soared.  He took his game to another level when he joined the Giants in 1997.  It may be coincidental that his performance accelerated when he started hitting in a lineup that featured Barry Bonds.  Maybe it was Bonds’ presence that allowed for Kent to do what he did in San Fran as he did not achieve the same output while with the Mets or Indians in prior years.

Nonetheless, Jeff Kent has a huge mountain to climb in order to get to the Hall of Fame.  By comparison, Andre Dawson received 45% of the vote on his first ballot in 2002 and Jim Rice got 29.8% of the vote in 1995.  It took both of these guys a pretty long time to gain enshrinement – and each of them started with a lot more votes than what Kent got in round one.

Jeff Kent

What do you think?  Can Jeff Kent take on this uphill battle and emerge victorious?  If so, how long will it take for him to reach 75%?

Let me hear it!

Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, And Frank Thomas Elected To The Hall Of Fame

Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, And Frank Thomas Elected To The Hall Of Fame

From MLB.com

NEW YORK — One of the most majestic induction classes in the history of the National Baseball Hall of Fame was set on Wednesday with the announcement that Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and Frank Thomas were elected by eligible writers of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America the first time they were on the ballot, all of them by big margins.

On the ballot for the second time, Craig Biggio, who had 3,060 hits in 20 seasons, all with the Astros, did not get the necessary 75 percent, falling 0.2 percent shy of induction and missing by a scant two votes.

The newly elected trio will attend an 11 a.m. ET news conference on Thursday at the Waldorf Astoria New York that will be simulcast on MLB.com and MLB Network.

Also to be inducted in July are three of the greatest managers of all time — Bobby Cox, Joe Torre and Tony La Russa — all selected by the Expansion Era Committee last month. They rank third, fourth and fifth in managerial victories in Major League history, each winning more than 2,000 games.

The Braves trio of Maddux, Glavine and Cox will be front and center in this, the 75th anniversary of the museum, during the ceremony behind the Clark Sports Center on July 27.

“It’s very humbling to go in with these guys,” said Maddux, who combined with Glavine to win 660 games. “It’s just icing on the cake. It’s going to be a special day and I’m going to be able to share it with special people.”

Thomas — who batted .301, hit 521 homers and amassed 1,704 RBIs in 19 seasons, 16 of them with the White Sox — is the first Hall of Famer to have played a majority of his games as a designated hitter. He appeared in 2,322 career games, with 1,351 coming as a DH and 971 at first base. Paul Molitor, who was elected in 2004, played more of his games as a DH than at any other position, but still just 44 percent of his total games played.

“This has been a stressful 48 hours. I am so excited that I’m in the Hall of Fame,” Thomas said. “This is something that I will have to sit back in the next three or four days and figure it out, because you can only dream so big, and this is as big as it gets for me. I’m a Georgia kid. Going in with Glavine, Maddux and Bobby Cox means a lot to me. The whole state of Georgia is going to be there, and I am just so blessed that I’ll be able to be there with these guys.”

 

That means six living members are heading toward one of the grandest Induction Weekends, from July 26-27, in Cooperstown, N.Y. The results of this year’s BBWAA vote were in stark contrast to that of last year, when the writers didn’t elect anyone.

Maddux and Glavine, a pair of 300-game winners who pitched the bulk of their careers for the Braves, were the favorites, but the 571 voters outdid themselves by also adding Thomas and coming so close on Biggio. It was the first time since 1999 — when Robin Yount, Nolan Ryan and George Brett were elected — that the writers put three first-time eligibles into the Hall.

Maddux, who won 355 games, the eighth-highest figure in Major League history, had 97.2 percent of the vote, failing to appear on 16 of the 571 ballots cast.

Glavine, who won 305 games, fourth-most among left-handers, was at 91.9 percent, and Thomas finished at 83.7.

Jack Morris, who won 254 games during his 18-year big league career and World Series titles with the Tigers, Twins and Blue Jays, didn’t make it in his 15th and final time on the writers’ ballot. He actually lost ground, falling to 61.5 percent from last year’s 67.7. Morris, who will be eligible for the Expansion Era Committee consideration in the fall of 2016, is only the second player in history to amass in excess of 60 percent of the vote at some point over his 15 years of eligibility and not make the Hall via the writers’ ballot. Gil Hodges is the other.

Maddux and Glavine are the only first-ballot pitchers to be elected together since Walter Johnson and Christy Mathewson were part of the inaugural class of 1936 along with Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb and Honus Wagner. They are the first living pair of 300-win pitchers to be elected in the same year and only the third pair in Hall of Fame history. The last starter to be elected by the BBWAA was Bert Blyleven in 2011, his 14th year of eligibility.

“It’s something I’m still trying to figure out how I feel,” Glavine said. “I’m just really humbled by the whole experience so far. I’m really excited about this whole process and this opportunity. I’m looking forward to it all. The opportunity to go in the Hall of Fame is one thing, but the opportunity to go in with two guys who were a very big part of my career means a lot to me.”

The Hall hasn’t inducted as many as six living baseball greats at the same time since 1971. Eleven were inducted in 1939, the year the red-brick museum opened its doors on Main Street, but they were from the first four classes, elected beginning in 1936. Last year, the three inductees elected by the Pre-Integration Committee — Yankees seminal owner Jacob Ruppert, catcher Deacon White and umpire Hank O’Day — were all deceased.

Maddux also pitched 10 seasons for the Cubs and had brief stays with the Padres and Dodgers at the end of his career. Glavine spent 17 seasons with the Braves and five with the Mets, for whom he won his 300th game. Cox managed Atlanta for 25 seasons and the Blue Jays for four, finishing with the Braves in 2010. John Smoltz, the third prong for a decade in that Atlanta rotation and who played 20 of his 21 seasons with the Braves, is slated to be on the ballot for the first time next year and has a very good chance of joining the trio.

“It was obvious with me and Glav, because we both retired at the same time and the managers go in in a different way,” said Maddux about the chances of being inducted at the same time as Glavine and Cox. “As soon as Bobby got in, I knew it had a chance of it being very special. He was there for half of my career and taught me so much about the game. It was a special honor for me to work under Bobby and play half of my career with Glav as well. The only thing that split it up is that Smoltzy played one more year.”

The July 26 awards ceremony at Doubleday Field stands to be formidable as well, with former catcher and longtime TV announcer Joe Garagiola Sr. receiving the Buck O’Neil Lifetime Achievement Award, longtime magazine writer Roger Angell selected by the BBWAA as the winner of the J.G. Taylor Spink Award for a career of meritorious baseball writing, and Rangers radio play-by-play man Eric Nadel earning the Ford C. Frick Award for excellence in broadcasting.

A year ago, when Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Sammy Sosa and Mike Piazza — players whose careers spanned baseball’s era of performance-enhancing drug use — made their initial appearances on the ballot, no one was elected by the writers for the first time since 1996, and only the second time since ’71.

Writers again rejected those players, with Piazza leading the pack at 62.2 percent, up from 58.7 percent last year. Clemens and Bonds had their percentages go down marginally to 35.4 and 34.7, respectively, but Sosa, who blasted 609 home runs and is the only player to have hit at least 60 homers in each of three seasons, slipped to 7.2 percent, barely remaining on the ballot.

Rafael Palmeiro, who failed a Major League Baseball-administered drug test in 2005, fell to 4.4 percent and was among 15 players to drop off the ballot. Palmeiro, with 569 homers and 3,020 hits, is one of only four players in history to amass both 500 homers and 3,000 hits. The other three are Hall of Famers Hank Aaron, Willie Mays and Eddie Murray.

A player must draw at least five percent of the vote each year to remain on the ballot for a maximum of 15 years.

Bonds is the all-time leader with 762 homers in his career and 73 in a single season. Clemens had 354 wins, one fewer than Maddux, and Piazza hit 396 of his 427 homers as a catcher — the most of any player at that position in Major League history.

Maddux said Bonds was the toughest hitter he ever faced in his career, but hesitated to opine on his status. Thomas, always regarded as one of the clean players of the era, said he harbors no animosity.

“I don’t fault anyone, I don’t fault anyone for what they did,” Thomas said. “But I went about it the right way. It was more about my family teaching me the right things. When I look at their numbers, I go, “Wow!” but I think if I hadn’t been hurt for 3 1/2 years, my numbers would have been right up there with them.”

Biggio seems to be on a clear course toward a plaque. Of the 26 other retired players who amassed 3,000 or more hits, only two are not in the Hall, and both suffer from extenuating circumstances, Palmeiro having failed a drug test and Pete Rose, the all-time leader with 4,256 hits, is banned from baseball because of gambling and is not eligible to be included on Hall of Fame ballots.

In a statement, Biggio said he was disappointed to not get in, tying Nellie Fox in 1985 and Pie Traynor in 1947 for the smallest margin of missing election in balloting history. But history is on his side. Traynor was elected in 1948. Fox was in his last year on the ballot when he fell two votes shy and was subsequently elected by the Veterans Committee in 1997.

“Congratulations to Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and Frank Thomas,” Biggio said. “Obviously, I’m disappointed to come that close. I feel for my family, the organization and the fans. Hopefully, next year.”

Biggio went from 68.2 percent in 2013 to 74.8 percent this year, right on the cusp.

“As surprised as I was last year that he didn’t get in, you almost feel heartbroken this year to be as close as he was,” Glavine said. “Craig was a tremendous competitor and had the respect of all of us who played against him. I think it’s just a matter of time before he’s in the Hall of Fame. I’m sure he’s disappointed today, having come so close, but I’m extremely confident that someday we’re going to watch him go through the same process.”

Glavine Maddux Thomas

Maddux, Glavine, Thomas Headline Stacked 2014 Hall of Fame Ballot

Maddux, Glavine, Thomas Headline Stacked 2014 Hall of Fame Ballot

From MLB.com

The induction ceremony for the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., next July 28 could have a real Atlanta Braves flavor to it.

Former Braves pitchers Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine, each a 300-game winner, head a ballot stacked with superstar newcomers that will be studied by eligible members of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America for the next month. The results of the election for 2014 induction will be announced at 2 pm ET on Jan. 8 on MLB.com and MLB Network, with a news conference at the Waldorf Astoria New York the next day to introduce any elected players.

Former Braves manager Bobby Cox is already among 12 men — including four all-time great managers — on the recently released ballot handed to the Expansion Era Committee, which will announce its determination on Dec. 9 during the first day of the Winter Meetings in Orlando, Fla. Joe Torre, Tony La Russa and Billy Martin are also on that ballot.

Frank Thomas, Jeff Kent and Mike Mussina join Maddux and Glavine as other noteworthy first timers, making this one of the deepest BBWAA ballots in Hall of Fame history. Jack Morris, with 254 victories during his 18-year big league career and World Series titles with the Tigers, Twins and Blue Jays, is on the writers ballot for the 15th and final time. Former Astros second baseman Craig Biggio, who led last year’s voting by being named on 68.2 percent of the ballots cast, returns for a second try.

Maddux and Glavine, who combined to win 660 games, seem to have the edge.

“It should be without a doubt for either one of them [to be elected], especially with Greg,” said John Smoltz, who joined Maddux and Glavine to form the “Big Three” of the Braves’ rotation for a decade and will be on the ballot himself next year.

“I know there’s been no unanimous [electee] in the history to the Hall of Fame, but I think [Maddux] would be it if there is. I’m biased. I watched Greg and Tom pitch my whole career, basically. They exemplified the fact that over 162 games, they were better than anybody else in the league.”

A year ago, when Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Sammy Sosa and Mike Piazza — hitters whose careers spanned baseball’s era of performance-enhancing drug use — made their initial appearances on the ballot, no one was elected by the writers for the first time since 1996, and only the second since 1971.

Chances are good a shutout won’t happen again this time. Maddux retired with 355 wins, 194 of them in l1 years with the Braves. Glavine had 305 victories, 244 in 17 years for Atlanta. Three hundred wins, like 3,000 hits, has long been a clear benchmark for eventually gaining entrance to the hallowed Hall. Biggio amassed 3,060 hits in 20 seasons, all with the Astros.

As in all Hall ballots, candidates need at least 75 percent of the vote to be elected.

Other first-timers also have fine credentials. Thomas, a first baseman and designated hitter, batted .301, hit 521 homers and amassed 1,704 RBIs in 19 seasons, 16 of them with the White Sox. Kent hit 377 homers in 17 seasons for six teams, 351 of them as a second baseman — the most in history by anyone at that position. Mussina won 270 games and had a 3.68 ERA in 18 seasons with the Orioles and Yankees.

Add to all this the fact that Cox, during his 25 years managing the Braves, had 1,709 of his 2,001 career victories, plus 15 playoff appearances — including 14 division titles, five National League pennants and the 1995 World Series championship.

“I’m confident at some point in time it’s going to happen,” Glavine said about his Hall of Fame chances. “Whether it’s on the first ballot, I don’t know. We’ll see. There are a lot of good players eligible. Would I love to have it happen on the first ballot? Sure. If it doesn’t, I’d be disappointed. But we’ll gear up for the following year and hopefully it will happen the following year.”

Biggio fell 39 votes shy of election on the 2013 ballot, as he received 388 votes among the 569 ballots cast. Five of those ballots were left blank. He was followed by Morris (67.7 percent), Jeff Bagwell (59.6) and Piazza (57.8). Piazza, it should be noted, hit 396 of his 427 homers as a catcher — the most of any player at that position in Major League history.

Bonds, the all-time home run leader with 762, garnered 36.2 percent of the vote. Clemens, a storied right-hander with 354 wins, did slightly better at 37.6 percent. Sosa, the only slugger to bash more than 60 homers in three different seasons, totaling 609 in his career, had 12.5 percent.

None of the three ever failed a publicly disclosed Major League Baseball-administered drug test, but all of them were once involved in either court cases or congressional hearings about the use of performance-enhancing drugs. Bonds is fighting a felony conviction for obstruction of justice in an appellate court regarding grand jury testimony. Clemens was acquitted of perjury for statements he made at a congressional hearing, and Sosa was called before another congressional hearing to testify.

“For a couple of years now, I think the whole steroids thing has put a twist in it,” said Morris, who needs 42 more votes to make it this time or he can be considered again in three years for the Expansion Era ballot. “A bunch of us guys have been thrown under the bus because they didn’t know what to do with the other pile. That’s unfortunate. It is what it is and I’m not going to fix it.”

Morris, who had an American League-best 162 of wins in the 1980s, tops a list of deserving long-time returnees that includes, among others, Bagwell, Lee Smith, Tim Raines, Alan Trammell and Edgar Martinez.

Among the second-timers, Biggio still seems to be on a clear course toward a plaque. Of the 26 other retired players who amassed 3,000 or more hits, only two are not in the Hall, and both have extenuating circumstances. Rafael Palmeiro had 3,020 hits and 569 homers but was suspended for a positive PED test in 2005, his last season in the Major Leagues. Most recently, Palmeiro was on 8.8 percent of the ballots. Pete Rose, the all-time leader with 4,256 hits, is banned from baseball because of gambling and is not eligible to be included on Hall of Fame ballots.

Clearly, though, Glavine and Maddux have the inside track. Both were crafty pitchers who were not overpowering but knew how to work both sides of the plate. In their decade together on the Braves from 1993 to 2002, before Glavine left to spend five seasons with the Mets, Atlanta went to the playoffs every season except for 1994, when the postseason was cancelled because of a players strike.

Maddux stayed until 2003, when he returned to the Cubs just the way he left Chicago for Atlanta — as a free agent. Maddux played 10 seasons in Chicago, including his first seven, finishing his career in 2008 after one short tour in San Diego and two stops in Los Angeles with the Dodgers.

Both were picked in the second round of the 1984 First-Year Player Draft and became mainstays of their improving teams. Maddux won 133 games for the Cubs. Glavine was a home-grown member of the Braves, and he returned to finish his career with Atlanta, getting his last two wins during 13 starts with the Braves in 2008.

Now, both of them are on the brink of immortality.

“When I retired, there was that talk of being a future Hall of Famer or whatever,” Glavine said. “Then I think as time went on, it became more a part of the conversation, whether it be every January, or as the calendar clicked closer and closer. Last year, there was a little more talk.

“Now that I’m officially on the ballot, there has been an increase in the conversation. So I think it comes in stages. When I first retired, I knew it was out there. But five years seemed like it was so far away. So in that respect, it’s hard to believe five years have gone by already.”

The remainder of the ballot consists of Moises Alou, Armando Benitez, Sean Casey, Ray Durham, Eric Gagne, Luis Gonzalez, Jacque Jones, Todd Jones, Paul Lo Duca, Edgar Martinez, Don Mattingly, Fred McGriff, Mark McGwire, Hideo Nomo, Rafael Palmeiro, Tim Raines, Kenny Rogers, Curt Schilling, Richie Sexson, Lee Smith, Mike Timlin, Alan Trammell and Larry Walker.

Hall Of Fame Debate: PICK ONE: Ryne Sandberg OR Jeff Kent

Hall Of Fame Debate: PICK ONE: Ryne Sandberg OR Jeff Kent

For the first time, Jeff Kent will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot in 2014.  And while we still have more than eight months to wait to see who ultimately is elected among the new/repeat players in that group, this week we will focus on the career of Jeff Kent.

And as I like to do, I will compare Kent to a player that I feel he matches up well against.  This time around, that player is former Cubs’ second baseman and Hall of Famer, Ryne Sandberg.

Like Sandberg, Kent was tops among second baseman during his playing days, so this should be a fun comparison.

Let’s get right down to it.  Here is a side-by-side:

  Kent Sandberg
Seasons 17 16
Games 2,298 2,164
On-Base % 0.356 0.344
Batting Average 0.29 0.285
Hits 2,461 2,386
200-hit seasons 0 1
150-hit seasons 7 9
Doubles 560 403
Triples 47 76
Home Runs 377 282
40+ HR seasons 0 1
30-39 HR seasons 3 1
RBI 1,518 1,061
100-RBI seasons 8 2
30 HR / 100 RBI seasons 3 1
Runs scored 1,320 1,318
Stolen bases 94 344
All-Star 5 10
Gold Glove 0 9
Silver Slugger 4 7
MVP 1 1
Postseasons 7 2
World Series appearances 1 0
World Series wins 0 0

*

When looking at these numbers, there are quite a few similarities in their career totals.  And there are some drastic differences too.

Sandberg was a more accomplished base stealer, defender, and appears to have been a more popular player based on his 10 All-Star Game selections.

Kent was the greater slugger and run producer of the duo – easily out-distancing himself from Sandberg in home runs and run production.  Kent also appeared in the playoffs seven times compared to Sandberg’s two times.

Jeff Kent Photo

So, that takes me to this week’s ‘Hall of Fame Debate’, and it is two-fold – (1)If you had to choose the better player based on his career accomplishments, who would you choose? (2) Is Jeff Kent worthy of Hall of Fame induction?

For me, when comparing the two, I can go back and forth quite a bit.  While their on-base and hitting numbers are eerily similar, there are major parts of their offensive game that are not.  Sandberg was much faster on the base paths than Kent, easily outpacing Kent’s career stolen bases by a ratio of more than 5:1.  The same could be said for Kent’s power production – his doubles, home run, and run production is much stronger than what Sandberg offered.  This could have a lot to do with where the player spent his prime years in the batting order on his team, but with the numbers so far apart, it is clear that Kent was more of a threat to drive the ball and knock in runs than Sandberg.

After careful, and exhaustive review, I believe that the better all-around player was Ryne Sandberg.  His base stealing and defense separate him from Kent, and those two parts of the game are simply impossible to ignore.  If I wanted one player at the plate with a man on second in a tied game, I would select Kent every time, but as far as what the player provided to his team, Sandberg was simply able to offer more due to his base running ability and defensive skills.

And now onto the conversation about Kent’s Hall of Fame future…

When I think about the greatest second baseman of the last 40 years, Jeff Kent’s name certainly creeps into the conversation.  And to be honest – there are not that many standout players for that position.  I believe that they all take a back seat to Joe Morgan, but after that you can say that Sandberg or Roberto Alomar or Jeff Kent is next.  And at some point in the near future, the name of Robinson Cano may be part of that conversation too.

Ultimately, I think that Jeff Kent will gain Hall of Fame induction, and I am on board with that.  He had a very solid 17-season career that included 7 playoff appearances.  He took certain aspects of offense to another level that no other second baseman has, and that should be recognized.

While not someone who I would select on his ‘First Ballot’, I endorse Jeff Kent for Hall of Fame induction!!!

Gavel

What do you think?  Who is the more accomplished player – Jeff Kent OR Ryne Sandberg?  And while you’re at it, tell me if you feel that Jeff Kent is worthy of Hall of Fame induction.

Thanks for reading.  Have a great night!!

Happy Birthday Jeff Kent!!

Happy Birthday Jeff Kent!!

Jeff Kent turns 45 years old today.

Jeff Kent may go down as one of the most talented offensive second basemen in baseball history.  And his 2000 MVP season was sensational.  During that year, Kent hit .334 as he collected 196 hits.  He crushed 33 homers, drove in 125 runs, and scored 114 times.  He was a member of the All-star team that year and won the first of his four Silver Slugger trophies too.

Happy Birthday Mr. Kent!

Former NL MVP Jeff Kent Makes His Debut On Survivor, RIGHT NOW!!!!

Former NL MVP Jeff Kent Makes His Debut On Survivor, RIGHT NOW!!!!

I like the show Survivor.  But I don’t call myself an avid fan.  If I remember that it is on, I try to watch it. 

But this year, I have even more reason to ‘not forget’ that it is on.

Former National League MVP Jeff Kent will be participating this season, and as an avid baseball fan, I feel like we will get to learn a little bit more about Kent than what we already know.  And for me, that is enough to get me to wacthing…

The show debuts at 8:00 tonight.  If you’re watching as well, I hope you enjoy it!!!

Former NL MVP Jeff Kent To Be On ‘Survivor’

Former NL MVP Jeff Kent To Be On ‘Survivor’

From USAToday.com

Who knew former MLB star Jeff Kent liked eating bugs, foraging for food and risking tropical disease?

Now we all know.

The five-time All-Star and 2000 NL MVP with the San Francisco Giants will join his favorite TV show as one of 15 contestants on the latest installment of Survivor, set in the Philippines.

Kent, 44, will match wits with the likes of 1980s sitcom star Lisa Whelchel, of Facts of Life fame, and two beauty pageant winners for the $1 million prize.

Seems money wouldn’t be the driving force here, since Kent made more than $85 million during his time on the diamond.

Kent, who left the game in 2008 after seasons with the Blue Jays, Mets, Indians, Giants, Astros and Dodgers, says he’s long been a fan of the show where contestants are pitted against each other in tribes on remote locations and must work together on team challenges while all the while conspiring against each other to avoid the dreaded flame dousing that will get you on a boat home.

One advantage Kent hopes he has over the others are his athletic accomplishments, team building and gritty will to win – all traits fans watched during his 17-year career.

“I’ve got a chip on my shoulder. I hate to lose. You know, there are not many tall white guys with mustaches walking around still these days. I’m hoping my reputation’s not big enough that these people know who I am.”

When asked how performance enhancing drug use, still cropping up in Kent’s old pasttime, could be used on the show he countered with this tongue-in-cheek answer:

“I think steroids would be a good thing for Survivor players, because you get the steroid rage coming out. That would create drama. You’d get guys running faster, holding on longer. “

It’s not his first foray into TV. He was a member of the cast of the short-lived, six-episode The Superstars in 2009, along with Ali Landry, Bode Miller, Jennifer Capriati and Brandi Chastain.

Fans can catch him – maybe eating night crawlers or crafting a raft with bamboo and kelp – in the 90-minute debut episode Sept. 19.

 

Happy Birthday Jeff Kent!!

Happy Birthday Jeff Kent!!

Jeff Kent turns 44 years old today.

Jeff Kent may go down as one of the most talented offensive second basemen in baseball history.  And his 2000 MVP season was sensational.  During that year, Kent hit .334 as he collected 196 hits.  He crushed 33 homers, drove in 125 runs, and scored 114 times.  He was a member of the All-star team that year and won the first of his four Silver Slugger trophies too.

Happy Birthday Mr. Kent!

Happy Birthday Jeff Kent!!

Happy Birthday Jeff Kent!!

Jeff Kent turns 43 years old today.

Jeff Kent may go dow nas one of the most talented offensive second basemen in baseball history.  And his 2000 MVP season was sensational.  During that year, Kent hit .334 as he collected 196 hits.  He crushed 33 homers, drove in 125 runs, and scored 114 times.  He was a member of the All-star team that year and won the first of his four Silver Slugger trophies too.

Happy Birthday Mr. Kent!