Tag Archives: reggie sanders

1975 Topps Set Card 295/660 – #617 – Rookie Infielders With Cubbage, DeCinces, Sanders, Trillo

1975 Topps Set Card 295/660 – #617 – Rookie Infielders With Cubbage, DeCinces, Sanders, Trillo

Progress: 295/660

Player Name:  Mike Cubbage, Doug DeCinces, Reggie Sanders, Manny Trillo

Card Number:  617

Team:  Texas Rangers, Baltimore Orioles, Detroit Tigers, Chicago Cubs

Position:  Infielders

Image Style:  Posed Portrait

How these players fared in 1975:

Mike Cubbage – Cubbage played in 58 games for the Rangers in ’75 hitting .224 with 32 hits in 143 at-bats.  Cubbage scored 12 runs for the team while connecting for 4 home runs and driving in 21.

Doug DeCinces – DeCinces hit .251 over 61 games for the Orioles in 1975.  He hit 6 doubles, 3 triples, and 4 home runs while also scoring 20 times and driving in 23.

Reggie Sanders – Sanders did not play in the major leagues during the 1975 baseball season.

Manny Trillo – Trillo finished in 3rd place for the ROY in 1975.  He hit .248 over 154 games as he connected for 135 hits including 12 doubles, 2 triples, and 7 home runs.  He also scored 55 runs while driving in 70.

617

Did You Know…

Reggie Sanders is the only player to play a complete season with a different team for seven straight years.  Following eight seasons with the Cincinnati Reds, Sanders left after the 1998 season and then spent one year with the Padres, Braves, Diamndbacks, Giants, Pirates, and Cardinals.

**factoid courtesy of ‘Big League Trivia’

‘Same Card, Different Paths’ – Card #34

‘Same Card, Different Paths’ – Card #34

1974 Topps – Card #600 – AKA – ‘The Bill Madlock Rookie Card’

Ron Cash – A utility player, Ron Cash’s major league career lasted just 2 seasons.  And while spending time at first base, third base, and in the outfield, Cash was never able to solidify his status as an everyday player.  Having competed in just 34 games, Cash compiled a solid .297 batting average alongside 30 hits, 11 RBI, and 14 runs scored.

Jim Cox – A second baseman with a solid glove, Cox played 4 seasons in the big leagues.  Appearing in 110 games and collecting 307 at-bats, Cox managed to collect just 66 hits, 3 home runs, 3 RBI, while scoring 33 runs.  His low .215 batting average and inability to get on base at a consistent level is what led to his downfall.

Bill Madlock – One of the most consistent and undervalued hitters of the 1970’s and 1980’s, Bill Madlock was solid at the plate.  His lifetime batting average of .305 is impressive and it also includes six seasons of hitting .325 or more.  Madlock won 4 batting titles during his career and amassed 2,008 hits.  He was a 4-time All-star and finished in the Top 18 for the MVP six times.

Reggie Sanders – While playing in just the 1974 baseball season, Sanders’ career was a short one – just 24 games.  He had 105 plate appearances and managed 27 hits, 3 home runs, 10 RBI, and 20 strikeouts.  While playing first base in all 24 games, Sanders committed 3 errors and retired with a .987 fielding percentage.

Ticket Stub #14 – Marlins vs. Reds – 04/04/1997

Ticket Stub #14 – Marlins vs. Reds – 04/04/1997

Pro Player Stadium – Miami, FL

Reds 9 – Marlins 7

This was game 4 for the Marlins’ 1997 season, and is the closest I have ever gotten to see a game on Opening Day.  Who would have thought that just a few months later the Marlins would be celebrating a World Series championship???

What stood out most in this game was the amazingly talented offensive line-ups each of these teams had.  The Reds were stacked with players like Deion Sanders, Ruben Sierra, Reggie Sanders, Barry Larkin, and Hal Morris.  The Marlins didn’t have a soft line-up either.  The roster contained Gary Sheffield, Moises Alou, Bobby Bonilla, Devon White, and Jeff Conine.  This was also the first game I ever saw Edgar Renteria play in live and he quickly became and still is one of my favorite Florida Marlins of all-time.

The biggest impression left on me after seeing this game was the obviuos talent of Reggie Sanders.  Sanders had a hell of a night going 3-for-4 with 1 home run and 6 RBI.  This is easily one of the best offensive performances I have witnessed during a live baseball game.

Cincinnati Reds AB R H RBI BB SO BA NOTES
Sanders 4 1 2 1 1 0 0.529  
Greene 2 1 1 1 2 0 0.286  
Larkin 3 2 0 0 2 0 0.100  
Sanders 4 1 3 6 1 1 0.471 HR
Morris 4 1 0 0 1 0 0.333  
Sierra 4 1 1 0 1 0 0.313  
Shaw 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.000  
Boone 5 0 0 0 0 0 0.111  
Tabuensee 3 1 1 0 2 0 0.400  
Bones 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.000  
Branson 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.000  
Jarvis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.000  
Timmons 1 0 1 0 0 0 0.500  
Mercker 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.000  
Harris 0 0 0 1 0 0 0.000  
Service 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.000  
Owens 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.000  
                 
Florida Marlins AB R H RBI BB SO BA NOTES
Castillo 5 0 1 0 0 0 0.421  
Renteria 5 1 2 2 0 0 0.235 SB
Sheffield 1 0 0 0 3 0 0.167  
Bonilla 5 0 2 1 0 0 0.333  
Eisenreich 3 0 0 0 1 0 0.000  
Hutton 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.000  
Helling 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.000  
Cangelosi 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.000  
White 5 1 2 0 0 1 0.357  
Conine 4 1 3 1 1 0 0.600  
Johnson 5 3 2 1 0 1 0.286  
Rapp 2 1 1 1 0 1 0.500  
Heredia 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.000  
Alou 1 0 1 1 0 0 0.462  

 

Hall of Famers in this game – Barry Larkin(???) & Gary Sheffield(???)

Is 400/400 the New 300/300???

Has baseball’s 300/300 club lost it’s luster?  In 2006, just 10 days apart from one another, this extremely rare club added 2 new members: Steve Finley and Reggie Sanders.  The club had grown by 50% in a matter of weeks and although there are only 6 players in baseball history  that have achieved this incredible accomplishment I have to wonder if the brilliance of this feat has been reduced?

Don’t get me wrong, Finley and Sanders are wonderful players that contributed to their teams with both power and smart base running.  This is a rare kind of player, and when mentioned alongside the other members they tend to stand out(not in a good way).  Barry Bonds, Willie Mays, Bobby Bonds, Andre Dawson…  and oh yeah, Steve Finley and Reggie Sanders.  By adding a 2-time All-Star and 1-time All-Star to this group of current Hall of Famers and sure to be future Hall of Famers(Dawson & Bonds) just doesn’t sit well with me.  Players like Carlos Beltran and Mike Cameron are closing in on joining the 300/300 club too and again they just don’t fit in with the original 4 members in my eyes.

Amazingly enough, the 4 original members of this club are also in the 400/400 club.  This is a true testament to their ability to display the perfect combination of power and speed throughout their careers. 

So, now I ask the question is 400/400 the new 300/300?  You always hear that 50 is the new 30, and 60 is the new 40 so I am throwing that into the world of baseball as I believe 400/400 is the new pinnacle for the perfect match of power, speed, and durability.  I don’t want to take anything away from Finley or Sanders, but I also wouldn’t want to diminish these other 4 baseball superstar’s accomplishments either. 

And now I have to wonder who may be next to join them.  There is a handful of talented players out there that could come close, but this 400/400 goal also shows that a player is able to stay healthy and committed to the game.

In my eyes, there is only 1 player that may be able to join this newly crowned elite 400/400 club in the next 10 years.  Ladies and Gentleman, I give you 6-time All-Star Alfonso Soriano.

As of games played through August 17, 2008, Soriano has 263 career home runs and 241 career stolen bases.  If he is able to maintain his health, which is questionable, and continues to average the stats he has compiled in his first 9 years as a professional baseball player, we may be seeing history made again in 6-7 years.