Tag Archives: ted simmons

1975 Topps Set Card 166/660 – #75 – Ted Simmons, Cardinals

1975 Topps Set Card 166/660 – #75 – Ted Simmons, Cardinals

Progress: 166/660

Player Name:  Ted Simmons

Team:  St. Louis Cardinals

Position:  Catcher

Image Style:  Posed Portrait

Years In The Major Leagues:  21 seasons, 1968-88

Notes From His 1975 Season:  Ted Simmons played in 157 games for the Cardinals in 1975, catching in 154 of them.  He hit .332 on the season collecting 193 hits in 581 at-bats.  Of his 193 hits, Simmons connected for 32 doubles and 18 home runs.  Simmons’ strong season earned him a 6th place finish for the NL MVP Award at the end of the ’75 season.

Notes From Career:  Ted Simmons capped his 21 season major league career with a lifetime .285 batting average with 2,472 hits.  He was an 8-time All-Star and captured one Silver Slugger Award.  He also placed in the Top 16 for the MVP Award six times.

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’30-YOC Top Ten Lists’ – Top Ten Switch-Hitters Of All-Time!!!

’30-YOC Top Ten Lists’ – Top Ten Switch-Hitters Of All-Time!!!

As the result of a recent Eddie Murray post that was published on this blog less than two weeks ago, and at the request of ’30-YOC’ loyal redear Matt, I am happy to present to you my ‘Top Ten Switch-Hitters Of All-Time’.

And while I don’t profess to be an expert on the subject of switch-hitting, a fair number of the guys that have cracked the ‘Top Ten’ have played during my generation.

And of the men that made this final cut, only one of them is active with a chance at still making moves to a higher spot on the list.

So, without further ado, here we go:

Honorable Mention – Chili Davis, Carlos Beltran, Willie McGee, Ruben Sierra, and Bobby Bonilla.

10 – Ted Simmons.  Lifetime .285 hitter with 2,472 hits, 483 doubles, and 248 home runs.

9 – Lance Berkman (active).  Lifetime .296 hitter with 1,822 hits, 405 doubles, and 358 home runs.

8 – Bernie Williams.  Lifetime .297 hitter with 2,336 hits, 449 doubles, and 287 home runs.  1 Silver Slugger award and 1 batting title.

7 – Tim Raines.  Lifetime .294 hitter with 2,605 hits, 430 doubles, and 170 home runs.  1 Silver Slugger and 1 Batting title.

6 – Frankie Frisch.    Lifetime .316 hitter with 2,880 hits, 466 doubles, and 105 home runs.

5 – Roberto Alomar.  Lifetime .300 hitter with 2,724 hits, 504 doubles, and 210 home runs.  4 Silver Slugger awards.

4 – Chipper Jones.  Lifetime .304 hitter with 2,615 hits, 526 doubles, and 454 home runs.  2 Silver Slugger awards and 1 batting title.

3 – Eddie Murray.  Lifetime .287 hitter with 3,255 hits, 560 doubles, and 504 home runs.  3 Silver Slugger awards.

2 – Mickey Mantle.  Lifetime .298 hitter with 2,415 hits, 344 doubles, and 536 home runs.  1 Batting title.

1 – Pete Rose.  Lifetime .303 hitter with 4,256 hits, 746 doubles, and 160 home runs.  1 Silver Slugger award and 3 Batting titles.

And there you have it.  Obviously with Chipper Jones sitting in the 4th spot on this list, he has the chance of still moving up.  Personally, I don’t think that he will as some of the major milestones ahead of him seem to be too far out of reach as he heads into what may be his final season in the majors.

But, what about the rest of my list?  Anyone in the wrong spot?  Did I miss anyone that you would have included?

Let me hear it.  And as always, ‘Thanks’ for reading!!!

’30-YOC Top Ten Lists’ – ‘Top Ten Forgotten Stars Of The 1960s & 1970s’

’30-YOC Top Ten Lists’ – ‘Top Ten Forgotten Stars Of The 1960s & 1970s’

Shout out to my man ‘Hackenbush‘ for the fantastic idea!!!

Being that we both have a fondness for players from that era, he challenged me with this idea.  And while it took me a few weeks longer than what I wanted, it was not due to lack of interest.  It was that I had to revamp and revise the list time after time after time.

And while I am still not 100% sold on the final rankings, I am ready to publish my list tonight.

As for criteria, I tried to pick players that starred during the 1960s and 1970s for the majority of their prime.  And while I do think that there are several HOFers that seem to be forgotten from that period (Fergie Jenkins and Lou Brock to name a few), if you are in the HOF you are not on my list.

So, with all of that being said – Let’s Do This!!!

Honorable Mention – Ted Simmons, Paul Blair, Ken Griffey, George Foster, Tony Oliva, Tug McGraw, and Lou Piniella.

10B – Tommy John – 288 career wins with 162 complete games is nothing to sneeze at.  John was an All-Star four times and made it to the playoffs five times.

10A – Dwight Evans – A supreme defender with a cannon for an arm, Evans also delivered a punch at the plate as he connected for 385 home runs, and driving in 1,384 runners.

9 – Willie Randolph – A slick defender with unreal quickness, Randolph stole 271 bases and scored 1,239 times en route to six All-Star selections.

8 – Fred Lynn – The 1975 ROY and MVP was a supreme star from the moment he took the field.  Earning nine straight All-Star selections to start his career, Lynn was on par with the best outfielders in the AL for a decade.  And his 1979 batting title aint to shabby either…

7  -Dave Parker – A slugger in every sense of the word, Parker clubbed home runs for a living while helping make the Pirates franchise relevant.  339 career home runs with two batting titles and 7 All-Star selections solidifies the resume of the 1974 NL MVP.

6 – Luis Tiant – Ask anyone that faced him during his prime and they will tell you.  Luis Tiant was a monster!!!  With 229 career wins and 187 complete games, Tiant was a worker.  He threw more than 200 innings in 8 of his 19 seasons.

5 – Keith Hernandez – Before he was appearing in Seinfeld episodes or selling hair color for men, Hernandez was dominating baseball games as a defensive specialist.  He collected 11 Gold Glove awards in 17 seasons and his batting title in 1979 coupled with his Gold Glove status made him an MVP.

4 – Bill Madlock – Winning four batting titles is remarkable.  And winning them over a stretch of a 11-season span shows your dedication to the craft.  Madlock retired with a .305 batting average and rang up 11 seasons in which he hit .300 or better.

3 – Dave Kingman – He was Rob Deer before Rob Deer.  He was Adam Dunn before Adam Dunn.  In total, Kingman crushed 442 home runs, including eclipsing the 30-HR mark seven times.  Kingman was a 3-time All-Star.

2 – Maury Wills – A threat on the base paths from the moment he stepped onto the field, Maury Wills raised the bar when it came to base running and specifically base stealing.  The league champion for six consecutive seasons, Wills was the single season record owner, and swiped 586 bags during his 14-year career.

1 – Vida Blue – With uncanny talent, and a string team behind him, Blue was the AL MVP and Cy Young winner in 1971.  He would have five more Top 7 finishes for the Cy Young Award and also 6 All-Star game appearances.  Most important, Blue competed in and won three consecutive World Series titles from 1972-74.

And there you have it.  If you asked me to do this again, I would probably rank them differently, but all of these guys had fantastic big league careers and they all deserve more credit and recognition by the sport and our hobby!!!

Thanks for reading.

1983 Topps Super Veteran – Ted Simmons

1983 Topps Super Veteran – Ted Simmons

Who knew?

21 major league seasons is what Ted Simmons gave us.  7 Top-20 MVP finishes too.  For some reason, I just cannot remember Ted Simmons from his playing days.  Yet, his numbers are pretty solid.  A career .285 hitter with 248 home runs and 1,389 RBI, Simmons certainly had his share of success in the big leagues.  Simmons was also a very versatile fielder as he spent periods of his career playing 1st base, 3rd base, catcher, and 2 outfield spots.

Super?  Maybe, maybe not.  Solid?  No doubt!!! 

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