Category Archives: 2014 Topps All-Rookie Cup Team

My 2014 Topps Series 1 ‘All Rookie Cup Team’ Set Is DONE!!!

My 2014 Topps Series 1 ‘All Rookie Cup Team’ Set Is DONE!!!

It’s been a while since I was able to boast that I have knocked out another modern subset, but that is exactly what I am able to do now.

I have finally pieced together, and completed, the ‘All Rookie Cup Team’ subset from this year’s Topps Series 1 release.

The set is 10 cards deep and features an All-Star line-up that includes all positions and two pitchers.

Here is the full set:

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The colors of this set are superb, and Topps gave us a pretty decent mix of action imagery (though I would have liked to have seen better images of Pujols & Rice).

As I, and many readers, have pointed out already in the set – The cards are missing a key Topps element, the Rookie Cup Trophy.  Over the decades, we have grown to expect these little trophies on our baseball cards, and I think that it would have been appropriate here to have them on the cards as well.

Personally, I think that this set grades out as a B, but if the trophies were part of the card’s design, we could be looking at a A, for sure!

The only other issue is the mix of players taken – but that is certainly subjective.  Would I take Jim Rice , Mike Trout, or CC Sabathia on my team?  Maybe not, but I won’t argue against them either.

Another subset in the books for ’30-YOC’!!!

2014 Topps Series 1 “Topps All Rookie Cup Team” – Mike Trout

2014 Topps Series 1 “Topps All Rookie Cup Team” – Mike Trout

Topps’ All-Rookie Team means a lot of different things to a lot of different collectors.  But, one thing is for certain – If your card is tagged with the All-Rookie Team logo, you did something during your first season in the big leagues to make yourself stand out from the rest.

And for that reason alone, I can totally support a set of cards that picks ‘The Best Of The Best’ from these teams.

In 2014, Topps issued a subset in their Series 1 release that took one player at each position, naming them to the ‘Topps All Rookie Cup Team’.

Representing one of the three outfielder positions is Mike Trout:

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While it was just two seasons ago that Mike Trout debuted in the big leagues, he has clearly made a name for himself.  And quickly too!

His numbers from his 2012 rookie campaign include: .326 batting average, .399 on-base percentage, 315 total bases including 27 doubles, 8 triples, and 30 home runs.  Trout stole 49 bases and was caught just 5 times.  He scored a league leading 129 runs for the Angels.

Trout was named as an All-star in 2012 while also winning a Silver Slugger Award, a Rookie Of The Year Award, and finishing in second place for the AL MVP.

 

2014 Topps Series 1 “Topps All Rookie Cup Team” – Tom Seaver

2014 Topps Series 1 “Topps All Rookie Cup Team” – Tom Seaver

Topps’ All-Rookie Team means a lot of different things to a lot of different collectors.  But, one thing is for certain – If your card is tagged with the All-Rookie Team logo, you did something during your first season in the big leagues to make yourself stand out from the rest.

And for that reason alone, I can totally support a set of cards that picks ‘The Best Of The Best’ from these teams.

In 2014, Topps issued a subset in their Series 1 release that took one player at each position, naming them to the ‘Topps All Rookie Cup Team’.

Representing the right-handed starting pitcher is Tom Seaver:

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Tom Seaver had a superb rookie season in 1967.  At 22 years of age, Seaver started 34 games for the Mets and posted a 16-13 record.  He threw 251 innings during his rookie campaign while striking out 170 batters and walking just 78.  Seaver posted an ERA of 2.76 as he allowed 77 runs during his 251 innings of work.

Seaver was an All-Star in 1967 and he also won the Rookie Of The Year Award.

2014 Topps Series 1 “Topps All Rookie Cup Team” – Jim Rice

2014 Topps Series 1 “Topps All Rookie Cup Team” – Jim Rice

Topps’ All-Rookie Team means a lot of different things to a lot of different collectors.  But, one thing is for certain – If your card is tagged with the All-Rookie Team logo, you did something during your first season in the big leagues to make yourself stand out from the rest.

And for that reason alone, I can totally support a set of cards that picks ‘The Best Of The Best’ from these teams.

In 2014, Topps issued a subset in their Series 1 release that took one player at each position, naming them to the ‘Topps All Rookie Cup Team’.

Representing the catcher is Jim Rice:

 

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While he played in 24 games for the Red Sox in 1974, the 1975 baseball season is commonly known as the rookie year of Jim Rice.

And he played very well:  174 hits in 144 games, .309 batting average, .350 on-base percentage, 29 doubles, 22 home runs, 92 runs scored,  and 102 RBI.

Rice finished in 2nd place for the Rookie of the Year voting in 1975, and he also received enough votes to capture 3rd place for the league’s MVP Award.

2014 Topps Series 1 “Topps All Rookie Cup Team” – Derek Jeter

2014 Topps Series 1 “Topps All Rookie Cup Team” – Derek Jeter

Topps’ All-Rookie Team means a lot of different things to a lot of different collectors.  But, one thing is for certain – If your card is tagged with the All-Rookie Team logo, you did something during your first season in the big leagues to make yourself stand out from the rest.

And for that reason alone, I can totally support a set of cards that picks ‘The Best Of The Best’ from these teams.

In 2014, Topps issued a subset in their Series 1 release that took one player at each position, naming them to the ‘Topps All Rookie Cup Team’.

Representing the catcher is Derek Jeter:

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While he played in 15 games during the 1995 baseball season, 1996 is known as Derek Jeter’s rookie campaign.

And it was superb!!  Jeter nabbed the AL ROY Award with his .314 batting average and .370 on-base percentage.  He connected for 183 hits in that season including 25 doubles, 6 triples, and 10 home runs.  He also stole 14 bases en route to scoring 104 runs and driving in 78.  In 654 plate appearances, Jeter struck out 102 times while drawing 48 walks.

 

2014 Topps Series 1 “Topps All Rookie Cup Team” – Ken Griffey Jr.

2014 Topps Series 1 “Topps All Rookie Cup Team” – Ken Griffey Jr.

Topps’ All-Rookie Team means a lot of different things to a lot of different collectors.  But, one thing is for certain – If your card is tagged with the All-Rookie Team logo, you did something during your first season in the big leagues to make yourself stand out from the rest.

And for that reason alone, I can totally support a set of cards that picks ‘The Best Of The Best’ from these teams.

In 2014, Topps issued a subset in their Series 1 release that took one player at each position, naming them to the ‘Topps All Rookie Cup Team’.

Representing the catcher is Ken Griffey:

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Ken Griffey Jr. has a lot of lofty expectations placed on him prior to his first at-bat as a major league player.

And during his debut season, he did not disappoint.  He played in 127 games for the Mariners during his rookie campaign.

The numbers:  120 hits, .264 batting average, .329 on-base percentage, 23 doubles, 16 home runs, 16 stolen bases, 61 runs scored, 61 RBI.

A very solid debut for Junior!

2014 Topps Series 1 “Topps All Rookie Cup Team” – Willie McCovey

2014 Topps Series 1 “Topps All Rookie Cup Team” – Willie McCovey

Topps’ All-Rookie Team means a lot of different things to a lot of different collectors.  But, one thing is for certain – If your card is tagged with the All-Rookie Team logo, you did something during your first season in the big leagues to make yourself stand out from the rest.

And for that reason alone, I can totally support a set of cards that picks ‘The Best Of The Best’ from these teams.

In 2014, Topps issued a subset in their Series 1 release that took one player at each position, naming them to the ‘Topps All Rookie Cup Team’.

Representing the catcher is Willie McCovey:

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Willie McCovey’s major league debut in 1959 was fantastic.  His numbers in 54 games played was enough to draw the attention of major league baseball as he was awarded with the Rookie Of The Year Award.

His numbers in 1959:  .354 batting average, .429 on-base percentage, 68 hits in 192 at-bats, 9 doubles, 5 triples, 13 home runs, 32 runs scored, 38 RBI, and just 35 strikeouts.

Not bad for a 21-year old kid.